achromatic


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Related to achromatic: Achromatic colors

achromatic

 [ak″ro-mat´ik]
1. producing no discoloration, or staining with difficulty.
2. refracting light without decomposing it into its component colors.
monochromatic (def. 2).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ach·ro·mat·ic

(ak'rō-mat'ik),
1. Colorless.
2. Not staining readily.
3. Refracting light without chromatic aberration.
[G. a- priv. + chrōma, color]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

achromatic

(ăk′rə-măt′ĭk, ā′krə-)
adj.
1. Designating color perceived to have zero saturation and therefore no hue, such as neutral grays, white, or black.
2. Refracting light without spectral color separation.
3. Biology Difficult to stain with standard dyes. Used in reference to cells or tissues.
4. Music Having only the diatonic tones of the scale.

ach′ro·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
a·chro′ma·tic′i·ty (-tĭs′ĭ-tē) n.
a·chro′ma·tism (ā-krō′mə-tĭz′əm) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

achromatic

adjective Colourless.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ach·ro·mat·ic

(ā'krō-mat'ik)
1. Without hue; of black, white, or gray color.
2. Not staining readily.
3. Refracting light without chromatic aberration.
[G. a- priv. + chrōma, color]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

achromatic

  1. having no colour.
  2. not easily coloured by staining agents.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

achromatic 

1. See achromatic lens.
2. The condition of being totally colour blind. See achromatopsia; white light; equal energy spectrum.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to characterize the materials employed in the achromatic doublet, the corresponding behavior of the refractive index versus wavelength of incident light is shown in Figure 1.
Figure 7 shows the relationship between observational average ratings and visibility level for achromatic and colored targets, which were lit by LEDs.
The usage depends on various factors, such as technical properties of the reproduction process, reproduction of tones and colors mostly in highlights and midtones, and as possible dedicated demands in achromatic (black and white) reproduction.
On the brightness (achromatic) plane composed of a brightness axis, Z3, and darkness axis, Z4, saturated colors are located near the center, while less saturated colors area close to the periphery (Figures 3 B, C).
Two different strategies for generation of black separation were used, with various combinations of achromatic substitutions.
For example, research directly related to the Word Colour Survey (Kay et al., 1997) uses an array of 330 colour patches from the Munsell Atlas colour surface (maximum possible saturation for each hue and lightness) plus ten pure achromatic stimuli (a grey scale).
Ninety-eight college students were asked to indicate their emotional responses to five principle hues (i.e., red, yellow, green, blue, purple), five intermediate hues (i.e., yellow-red, green-yellow, blue-green, purple-blue, and red-purple), and three achromatic colors (white, gray, and black) and the reasons for their choices.
However it was not until the 19th century when the use of achromatic lenses were implemented to reduce distortion that the telescope came into its own right, and became a popular scientific instrument.
The discussion is focused on issues of color space viewed against a simple achromatic surround, and does not address color appearance under widely varying light and surround conditions.
The magnifiers incorporate achromatic, coated multiple lens systems that provide bright, crisp, clear, color-corrected, and distortion-free viewing.
Ostergaard and Davidoff (1985) found that colored photographs presented tachistoscopically were named more quickly than achromatic photos, but that chromaticity had no effect in a recognition task employing the same stimuli.
Here is a multicoated, 3.1-inch (80-mm) achromatic refractor of 900-mm focal length (f/11) with a German equatorial mount, dual-axis slow-motion controls, and an adjustable aluminum tripod.