aching

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ach·ing

(āk'ing)
A dull continuous pain.
[O.E. acan, to ache]
References in periodicals archive ?
Singer-songwriter Teitur, who hails from the Faroe Islands, has a way of making a relatively simple little song both devastating and achingly beautiful.
The protagonists are both archetypically mythic and achingly human.
Having already played a couple in the TV movie Longford (2006), Broadbent and Duncan are achingly realistic.
Said to be 'jaw achingly funny', the book tells the chilling, but amusing tale of a boy and his dad who stand up to an evil dentist.
Sharing his vision, he allows us to peek into a stunning collection of homes from style gurus, such as jewellery designer Elsa Peretti and fashion designer Anna Sui, all achingly cool, shockingly fabulous and extremely inspirational.
With her whispy blonde locks and love of ripped fishnets and Doc Marten boots, the grungy Gossip Girl star looks more street urchin than achingly cool starlet.
While the book is not always grippingly exciting or achingly funny, it tightropes between the two with the help of Lethem's sharp descriptions, intriguing psychology and, of course, warped imagination.
There's a thin line between writing achingly personal music and being the dude in bootcut jeans who is trying to get laid.
more interesting than anything I could have contrived to put there." Her intuitive paintings reflect "waking dreams" - haunting, achingly familiar images evoking that which can be felt but never spoken.
Many mega-celebrities - including Rod Stewart - are grateful that tractor-builder Ferruccio Lamborghini switched his attention to producing achingly beautiful, astonishingly fast, supercars.
Indeed, the whole movie is perfectly paced and balanced between the bittersweet and the achingly ridiculous.
In a less publicized variant on this story, the Native American author "Nasdijj," whose own rage-filled memoir of childhood abuse The Boy and the Dog Are Sleeping was praised as "achingly honest" by The Miami Herald, now appears to be an invention of the non-Indian writer Tim Barrus, whose previous specialty was gay erotica.