acetone


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Related to acetone: hexane, Acetone Breath, Acetone peroxide

acetone

 [as´ĕ-tōn]
a compound, CH3·CO·CH3, with a characteristic odor; it is used as a solvent and as an antiseptic. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies produced in abnormal amounts in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and metabolic acidosis. See also ketosis.

ac·e·tone

(as'e-tōn),
A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid; extremely small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in the urine and blood of people with diabetes, sometimes imparting an ethereal odor to the urine and breath. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies, and is used as a solvent in many pharmaceutical and commercial preparations.
Synonym(s): dimethyl ketone

acetone

(ăs′ĭ-tōn′)
n.
A colorless, volatile, extremely flammable liquid ketone, C3H6O, widely used as an organic solvent. It is one of the ketone bodies that accumulate in the blood and urine when fat is being metabolized.

ac′e·ton′ic (-tŏn′ĭk) adj.

Acetone

Chemistry A colourless, highly volatile and flammable solvent* which is the simplest ketone. It mixes with water, ethanol and oil; it melts at 95.4º C and boils at 56º C.
Endocrinology A so-called ketone body which is normally present in scant amounts in the urine and serum of normal individuals, produced by oxidation of fats. Ketones are increased in diabetes, markedly so in diabetic ketoacidosis and starvation. 
Toxic range > 20 mg/dL
*Acetone is used as a solvent in chemical, cosmetic—e.g., nail polish remover—and pharmaceutical industries.

acetone

Endocrinology A ketone body normally present in scant amounts in the urine and serum of normal individuals produced by oxidation of fats; ketones ↑ in DM, DKA, starvation. See Ketone body.

ac·e·tone

(as'ĕ-tōn)
A colorless, volatile, inflammable liquid; small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in urine and blood of diabetic patients; sometimes imparts an ethereal odor to the urine and breath as a result of starvation or excessive vomiting. Used as a solvent in some pharmaceutical and commercial preparations and as a fixative for fluorescent antibody stains.

acetone

A KETONE body derived from acetyl coenzyme A in untreated DIABETES or starvation. See also ACETONE BODY.

acetone 

Liquid ketone (dimethyl ketone and propanone) used as a solvent for many organic compounds (e.g. cellulose acetate) and for repairing spectacle frames.

ac·e·tone

(as'ĕ-tōn)
A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid; extremely small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in the urine and blood of people with diabetes, sometimes imparting an ethereal odor to the urine and breath.
References in periodicals archive ?
A 25 to 65% significant reduction in larval weight related to the control diet treatment were obtained with the acetone, methanol, and aqueous extract of T.
The glass transition temperatures of UV-irradiated PC before and after acetone transport are listed in Table 2.
The antibacterial activities of the hexane, chloroform, acetone extract, and pure constituents of the flowers of V.
In the experiments, we investigated the effect of acetone injection angle and the distance between the laser sheet and the flat on the PLIF image.
A room temperature sensor based on graphene/PANI nanocomposite was demonstrated for toluene at 50[degrees]C operation [15] and recently inclusion of W[O.sub.3] into PANI matrix has been reported to perform acetone and ETA detection at room temperature [16,17].
Table-1: % Recovery of the fish scale hydrolysate fractions by solvent extraction and tituratration (Only acetone).
Researchers asked the test subjects to blow into a tube that was connected to the acetone sensor at regular intervals.
In the present research work, we interest to produce CNSL bio oil from the waste cashew nut shell and enhance the fuel's properties with Acetone additive.
ABSTRACT: The work reported in this article is an extension of the project conducted by some researchers in Pakistan on the antibacterial activity of medicinal seeds and oils extracted from them using ethanol and acetone as solvents.