acetone


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Related to acetone: hexane, Acetone Breath, Acetone peroxide

acetone

 [as´ĕ-tōn]
a compound, CH3·CO·CH3, with a characteristic odor; it is used as a solvent and as an antiseptic. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies produced in abnormal amounts in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and metabolic acidosis. See also ketosis.

ac·e·tone

(as'e-tōn),
A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid; extremely small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in the urine and blood of people with diabetes, sometimes imparting an ethereal odor to the urine and breath. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies, and is used as a solvent in many pharmaceutical and commercial preparations.
Synonym(s): dimethyl ketone

acetone

/ac·e·tone/ (as´ĕ-tōn) a flammable, colorless, volatile liquid with a characteristic odor, which is a solvent and antiseptic and is one of the ketone bodies produced in ketoacidosis.

acetone

(ăs′ĭ-tōn′)
n.
A colorless, volatile, extremely flammable liquid ketone, C3H6O, widely used as an organic solvent. It is one of the ketone bodies that accumulate in the blood and urine when fat is being metabolized.

ac′e·ton′ic (-tŏn′ĭk) adj.

acetone

[as′ətōn]
a colorless, aromatic, volatile liquid ketone body found in small amounts in normal urine and in larger quantities in the urine of diabetics experiencing ketoacidosis or starvation. It is one of the group of compounds called ketones. Commercially prepared acetone is used to clean the skin before injections, but prolonged exposure to the compound can be irritating. It also has many varied industrial uses. Also called 2-propanone.

Acetone

Chemistry A colourless, highly volatile and flammable solvent* which is the simplest ketone. It mixes with water, ethanol and oil; it melts at 95.4º C and boils at 56º C.
Endocrinology A so-called ketone body which is normally present in scant amounts in the urine and serum of normal individuals, produced by oxidation of fats. Ketones are increased in diabetes, markedly so in diabetic ketoacidosis and starvation. 
Toxic range > 20 mg/dL
*Acetone is used as a solvent in chemical, cosmetic—e.g., nail polish remover—and pharmaceutical industries.

acetone

Endocrinology A ketone body normally present in scant amounts in the urine and serum of normal individuals produced by oxidation of fats; ketones ↑ in DM, DKA, starvation. See Ketone body.

ac·e·tone

(as'ĕ-tōn)
A colorless, volatile, inflammable liquid; small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in urine and blood of diabetic patients; sometimes imparts an ethereal odor to the urine and breath as a result of starvation or excessive vomiting. Used as a solvent in some pharmaceutical and commercial preparations and as a fixative for fluorescent antibody stains.

acetone

A KETONE body derived from acetyl coenzyme A in untreated DIABETES or starvation. See also ACETONE BODY.

acetone 

Liquid ketone (dimethyl ketone and propanone) used as a solvent for many organic compounds (e.g. cellulose acetate) and for repairing spectacle frames.

ac·e·tone

(as'ĕ-tōn)
A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid; extremely small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in the urine and blood of people with diabetes, sometimes imparting an ethereal odor to the urine and breath.

acetone (as´ətōn),

n Dimethylketone; 1. an organic solvent.
2. in the body, a chemical that is formed when the body uses fat instead of glucose for energy. The formation of acetone means that cells lack insulin or cannot effectively use available insulin to burn glucose for energy. It passes through the body into the urine as ketone bodies.
3. the simplest ketone. It is normally present in urine in small amounts but can increase in those who have diabetes mellitus. Results in having “fruity” acetone breath.

acetone

a compound, CH3COCH3, with solvent properties and characteristic odor, obtained by fermentation or produced synthetically; it is a by-product of acetoacetic acid. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies produced in abnormal amounts in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, metabolic acidosis, pregnancy toxemia and acetonemia of ruminants.

acetone bodies
acetone, acetoacetic acid and beta-oxybutyric acid, being intermediates in fat metabolism. Called also ketone bodies.
acetone poisoning
in companion animals causes narcosis, gastritis and renal and hepatic damage.
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erecta flowers and leaves (n-hexane, acetone and ethanol) was incorporated into the above meridic diet at final concentrations of 500 ppm and the effects of these preparations on the development and survival of S.
ELISA analysis of homogenates and acetone extracts of these same samples showed the presence of brevetoxins in samples 2 and 3 while sample 1 was toxin-free (Figure 6B).
The procedures for preparing calibrators and breath acetone analysis required special attention to the quality of the laboratory air.
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This crosslinks the polymers and alters the physicochemical nature of the film, which provides a quantification of the acetone and thus the blood-glucose levels.
The coatings industry is very concerned that if the LVP exemption is removed, painters and consumers will move from mineral spirit-based paint thinners and multipurpose solvents to acetone and methyl acetate, which may lead to increased fires, injuries, and deaths.
I have tried acetone and cleaning remedies but nothing will shift it.
Methods proposed for the preservation of insect tissue for DNA analysis have included various concentrations of ethanol, Carnoy's solution, liquid nitrogen, and acetone (Post 1993; Dessauer 1996; Fukatsu 1999; Mtambo 2006).
95 in a solvent selected from one or more of acetone and tetrahydrofuran, and wherein the first-coating composition is applied in one or more separate applications, allowing the first-coating composition to dry after each application; and applying a second-coating composition onto the dried first-coating, wherein the second-coating composition comprises a polymer product having a gel fraction of greater than 0.