acetaldehyde


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acetaldehyde

 [as″et-al´de-hīd]
a colorless volatile liquid used in the manufacture of acetic acid, perfumes, and flavors, which is irritating to mucous membranes and has a general narcotic action. It is also an intermediate in the metabolism of alcohol.

ac·et·al·de·hyde

(as-e-tal'dĕ-hīd),
An intermediate in yeast fermentation of carbohydrate and in alcohol metabolism. It is a central agent for the toxic effects of ethanol.
Synonym(s): acetic aldehyde, ethanal

acetaldehyde

(ăs′ĭ-tăl′də-hīd′)
n.
A colorless, flammable liquid, C2H4O, used to manufacture acetic acid, perfumes, and drugs.

acetaldehyde

The major metabolic product of ethanol, which is generated by ethanol dehydrogenase and subsequently metabolised to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase. It is responsible for alcohol’s toxic effects.

It is postulated that the liver injury induced by ethanol is due to tissue responses to acetaldehyde, including acetaldehyde-induced fibrogenesis, acetaldehyde-induced lipid peroxidation enzyme inhibition, and formation of antibodies against acetaldehyde adduct proteins—e.g., serum albumin, hemoglobin, and cytokskeletal proteins, including tubulin.

Ref range
< 0.02 mg/dL.
 
Method
Gas chromatography.

acetaldehyde

Toxicology The major metabolic product of ethanol, which is generated by ethanol dehydrogenase and subsequently metabolized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase, and responsible for drinking-alcohol's toxic effects

ac·et·al·de·hyde

(as'ĕ-tal'dĕ-hīd)
An intermediary product in the metabolism of alcohol.

acetaldehyde

A product of the metabolism of large amounts of alcohol. The reaction is catalyzed in the liver by the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase. The principal cause of the toxic effects of strong drink. Acetaldehyde is a powerful poison, considerably more toxic than alcohol, and is capable of damaging almost any part of the body. Fortunately the body has a range of detoxifying enzymes, aldehyde dehydrogenases, one of which, ALDH2, rapidly break down the acetaldehyde molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acetaldehyde, furfural and acrolein were also reported at low levels (concentrations lower than LOQ of the method: 1.5, 1.4 and 1.0[micro]g [L.sup.-1] and higher than LOD: 0.8; 0.5 and 0.7[micro]g/Lin 57, 71 and 76% of samples, respectively), which do not pose a health risk.
Oxidative degradation products such as aldehydes were prominent in the VOC profiles with both soy flour and CGM and found to contribute significantly to higher acetaldehyde and hexaldehyde emissions.
The time, species, as well as the interaction of species and time showed significantly impact on ethanol and acetaldehyde content in grapes (Table 2).
At 30 days at 5[degrees]C + 5 days of SL at 22 [degrees]C, deastringent fruit and deastringent fruit + 1-MCP displayed ethanol (0.60 and 0.67 [mucro]g [g.sup.-1]) and acetaldehyde (0.020 and 0.025 [mucro]g [g.sup.-1]) (Figures 4A and B) content which could be sufficient for the complete astringency reduction (Figures 1A and B).
The study said that over 540 million people in Asia carry a mutation in the ALDH2 gene, which means they can't process acetaldehyde which causes the widely documented red flush reaction in Asians.
Treatment of LX-2 cells with acetaldehyde with or without alpha mangostin did not result in any significant changes in cell morphology as shown in Figure 1.
The cell viabilities of A549 cells treated with acetaldehyde or L-Cys at different concentrations were determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) assay to evaluate the possible cytotoxic effects of acetaldehyde or L-Cys.
Acetaldehyde, a toxic by-product of ethanol metabolization, has been described as a causative agent of the alterations to the CNS during its consumption (Hunt, 1996; Bergamaschi et al., 1988; Zimatkin & Deitrich, 1997; Thadani & Truitt, 1977; Heap et al., 1995).
However, only 4.70 x [10.sup.-3] molecules of ethanol are converted to acetaldehyde on each Mo site per second.
It is crucial that suppliers have scientific evidence to support claims that their products do not contain carcinogens and toxic chemicals such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, ACCC Commissioner Sarah Court said.
Stable anthocyanin-derived pigments also can be formed through reactions with pyruvic acid and acetaldehyde to form vitisin A and vitisin B, respectively.
Most first pass metabolism occurs in the liver [49, 55] and the rate-limiting step is the oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde. This reaction is catalyzed by proteins of the ADH family [56], of which class I (ADH1) and III (ADH3) enzymes metabolize ethanol in the liver [57, 58].