acephalous


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acephalous

 [a-sef´ah-lus]
headless.

a·ceph·a·lous

(ā-sef'ă-lŭs),
Headless.

acephalous

(ā-sĕf′ə-ləs)
adj.
1. Biology Headless or lacking a clearly defined head: acephalous worms.
2. Having no leader.

a·ceph·a·lous

(ā-sef'ă-lŭs)
Headless.

acephalous

Headless.

acephalous

without a head.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For, given his poem's theme of marital haunting, Hardy has with characteristic ingenuity made feminine endings an earnest of uncanny wifely initiatives; acephalous catalexis becomes a prosodic trope for the absence/presence of a remarried widower's paranormal experience.
In 'Segmental Acephalous Network Systems', Barclay takes on the 'persistent belief that the state and bureaucracy are necessary and inevitable features of any complex social system', pointing out that the 'social organisation of most cultures throughout the world and through time [...] had an acephalous network character rather than the hierarchical centralised structure so prevalent in the modern state.' Briefly mentioning hunter-gatherer societies, in which people generally 'lived in very small groups', Barclay focuses instead on 'more complex societies with large populations' that were able to function without a 'bureaucratic hierarchy'.
It is the fourth item in the Nowell Codex, preceded by three prose texts--the acephalous Life of St.
Prior to colonialism, women held political positions in Uganda as rulers in tripartite power-sharing arrangements and as female elders within acephalous political systems.
The earliest version from the end of the eleventh century (found in Lebor na hUidre and the Yellow Book of Lecan) shows clear signs of being a pastiche of elements dating from the ninth to the eleventh centuries, and it is acephalous, beginning in medias res; it has, however, its age to recommend it, as well as an appealing immediacy and intensity.
This sovereign function, however, is contingent on the prior emergence of a decisive hegemonic bloc out of the present chronically fractured and acephalous polity.
(153) Statutory law has become synonymous with not only Western ideologies, but also a top-down, dictatorial approach to governance, whereas customary laws may be more acephalous or communitarian.
That is, Michigan's scattered acephalous (without a head) hands were treated by Washington as foreign governments that could sign treaties involving the transfer of property rights that were not part of the Native Americans' unwritten legal systems--systems that seemed to recognize sovereignty and rights of use hut not sole ownership nor land demarcated by clear boundaries.
Liszka suggests that these extant (and in the case of the Ministry acephalous) texts were formerly part of a larger temporale that would have, akin to several other SEL manuscripts, covered holy lives beginning with the Old Testament and running through the lives of Mary and Christ.
When apert and its acephalous form pert passed from medieval French into English, they showed the same kind of positive and negative senses 'bold, valiant' and also 'too forward, pushy' that were seen in the Middle English bawd/baude.
Hardt and Negri (2000) suggest that these moments of rebellion were themselves incorporated into a new constitutional settlement which became the foundation of contemporary US capitalism and by its extension the new acephalous Empire.