acellular


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Related to acellular: acellular vaccine, acellular cementum

acellular

 [a-sel´u-ler]
lacking cells or not cellular in structure.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·cel·lu·lar

(ā-sel'yū-lăr),
1. Devoid of cells. Synonym(s): noncellular (2)
2. A term applied to unicellular organisms that do not become multicellular and are complete within a single cell unit; frequently applied to protozoans to emphasize their complete organization within a single cell.
[G. a- priv. + L. cellula, a small chamber]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

acellular

(ā-sĕl′yə-lər)
adj.
Containing no cells; not made of cells.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

acellular

adjective Lacking cells, typically used in reference to a body fluid—e.g., ascitic fluid, CSF, cysts that have no cells.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·cel·lu·lar

(ā-sel'yū-lăr)
1. Devoid of cells.
2. A term applied to unicellular organisms that do not become multicellular and are complete within a single cell unit.
[G. a- priv. + L. cellula, a small chamber]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

acellular

Devoid of cells. Some connective tissues incorporate acellular areas.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

acellular

(of an organism) having a body which is not composed of cells. Acellular organisms may have a complex structure differentiated into specialized areas and ORGANELLES. Such organisms are also described as unicellular, although this adjective suggests a simple structure, which is not the case.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

a·cel·lu·lar

(ā-sel'yū-lăr)
Devoid of cells.
[G. a- priv. + L. cellula, a small chamber]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Management of gingival recession by the use of an acellular dermal graft material: a 12-case series.
Heisterkamp, "Comment on "Evaluation of Complication Rates after Breast Surgery Using Acellular Dermal Matrix: Median Follow-Up of Three Years,' Plastic Surgery International, vol.
In the United States, investigators at Northern California Kaiser Permanente have shown that the effectiveness of acellular pertussis in the Tdap vaccine wanes rapidly in adolescents.
At 48 h time interval sub mucosal layer was completely acellular. The collagen fibers were compact with moderate porosity than the native tissue.
Caption: Estimated expected protection from pertussis by acellular vaccines
Pertussis infection is common in SA infants, [2] and further studies to determine the efficacy or effectiveness of the acellular pertussis vaccine will almost certainly be needed.
Quadracel (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed and inactivated poliovirus vaccine).
Seven of the LAMN cases showed no neoplastic epithelium at the margin, but had dissecting acellular mucin at the margin (Figure 3).
Would it be effective to use the acellular vaccine for the first three shots--until the child is 18 months old--and then give the old whole-cell vaccine?
This research intended to use the Schwann cells-like cells that differentiated from Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) as the seed cells and acellular nerve graft processed by chemical method as the three-dimensional cells scaffolds to construct the tissue-engineering peripheral nerve graft which used to repair the sciatic nerve defect of rats, thus providing the experimental base for the clinical application.