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ac·cur·a·cy

(ak'kū-ră-sē), Do not confuse this word with precision.
The degree to which a measurement, or an estimate based on measurements, represents the true value of the attribute being measured. In the laboratory, accuracy of a test is determined when possible by comparing results from the test in question with results generated using reference standards or an established reference method.

accuracy

[ak′yərəsē′]
the extent to which a measurement is close to the true value.

accuracy

The degree to which, on average, a test represents the true value—i.e., is unbiased.

Lab medicine
The extent to which a value from a test reflects or agrees with the reference value of the analyte being tested, measured statistically by standard deviations; the proportion of correct outcomes of a method (often used interchangeably with concordance in two-by-two tables).

Accuracy is insufficient for describing the performance of medical tests and deciding when to use what, because accuracy has two separate components and depends on the prevalence of the condition for which the test is appropriate. The degree of reproducibility of test results, regardless of whether or not they are accurate, are measured statistically by the coefficient of variation; the degree to which a measurement (e.g., the mean estimate of a treatment effect) is true or correct. An estimate can be accurate, yet not be precise, if it is based upon an unbiased method that provides observations having great variation—i.e., not close in magnitude to each other.

accuracy

Lab medicine The extent to which a value from a test reflects or agrees with the reference value of the analyte being tested, measured statistically by standard deviations; the proportion of correct outcomes of a method–often used interchangeably with concordance. See Coefficient of variation, Diagnostic accuracy, Inaccuracy, Two-by-two table. Cf Precision.

ac·cur·a·cy

(ak'kyūr-ă-sē)
The degree to which a measurement represents the true value of the attribute that is being measured; refers to the closeness of an analytic result to an actual result.

accuracy

the closeness with which an observation or a measurement of a variable approximates its true value. An important component of diagnostic tests. An accurate test implies freedom from both random and systematic error. See also precision.
References in classic literature ?
When we pass from the works of nature, in which all the delineations are perfectly accurate, and appear to be otherwise only from the imperfection of the eye which surveys them, to the institutions of man, in which the obscurity arises as well from the object itself as from the organ by which it is contemplated, we must perceive the necessity of moderating still further our expectations and hopes from the efforts of human sagacity.
As there is no existing word, our definition would perhaps be more accurate if we coined some word like 'ruddered' as the correlative of 'rudder'.
That very man whose judgment was so sound and accurate where merit was concerned - he who had swept into his coffers the inheritance of Nicholas Fouquet, who had robbed him of Lenotre and Lebrun, and had sent him to rot for the remainder of his life in one of the state prisons - merely remembered the peaches of that vanquished, crushed, forgotten enemy
He knew her as "Miss Mason," and that was all, though he was aware that as a stenographer she seemed quick and accurate.
In 1604 an ecclesiastical conference accepted a suggestion, approved by the king, that a new and more accurate rendering of the Bible should be made.
Our American character is marked by a more than average delight in accurate perception, which is shown by the currency of the byword, "No mistake.
These qualities were indeed so characteristical in his countenance, that, while the spirit and sensibility in his eyes, though they must have been perceived by an accurate observer, might have escaped the notice of the less discerning, so strongly was this good-nature painted in his look, that it was remarked by almost every one who saw him.
Some of his own holdings were imperilled, and the man was working like some high-geared, delicate, strong machine--strung to full tension, going at full speed, accurate, never hesitating, with the proper word and decision and act ready and prompt as clockwork.
There are a few allusions to China in this book, all of which were written before I had been in China, and are not intended to be taken by the reader as geographically accurate.
The tact which I find here, the discretion, the rare courage, the wonderful power of memory, the accurate observation of character, the easy grace of style, the charming outbursts of womanly feeling, have all inexpressibly increased my admiration of this sublime creature, of this magnificent Marian.
I supposed the guns were fired for my benefit, and changed my course for the sounds--not that I think the sense more accurate, or even as accurate as a mathematical calculation, but I feared that some of the children might need my services.
Its somewhat ambitious title was "The Book of Life," and it attempted to show how much an observant man might learn by an accurate and systematic examination of all that came in his way.

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