acculturation


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acculturation

 [ah-kul″cher-a´shun]
the process of adapting or learning to take on selected behaviors of another group; change generally occurs between both cultures that are in contact.

acculturation

[əkul′chərā′shən]
1 the process of adopting the cultural traits or social patterns of a different population group.
2 the modification of the culture of a group resulting from association with another group.

acculturation

The process of incorporating the culture, mores and values of another group; the exchange of cultural features (traditions, values, or religious beliefs comprising the way of life) that results when groups of individuals from different cultures come into continuous direct contact, resulting in an alteration in the cultural patterns of one or both groups. While acculturation is in theory bilateral, in most instances the minority culture becomes integrated into the population’s majority culture.

Acculturation

A term which is generally defined as the exchange of cultural features (traditions, values, or religious beliefs comprising the way of life) which results when groups of individuals from different cultures come into continuous direct contact, resulting in an alteration in the cultural patterns of one or both groups. While, theoretically, acculturation can work in both directions, the norm is that the minority population is assimilated into the population’s dominant majority.

ac·cul·tur·a·tion

(ă-kŭl'chŭr-ā'shŭn)
Adaptation by a person or group to customs, values, beliefs, and behaviors of a new country or culture.
References in periodicals archive ?
As an instructor, I found it was important to identify each student's unique acculturation strategy early on in order to help nurture it.
H2: The effect of narrative exposure on HPV-related outcomes will be moderated by acculturation, such that less acculturated Latinas in the narrative condition will experience a greater shift in (a) descriptive norms, (b) injunctive norms, and (c) behavioral intent to vaccinate adolescent daughters and sons, compared with their acculturated counterparts.
We contend that both the culture of poverty thesis that has been used to explain Puerto Rican poverty, and much of the research that attributes Latino health disparities to acculturation are consistent with a White Racial Framing of Puerto Rican life chances.
Thus, we explored the role of ethnic identity and acculturation level in the career path of Latinas/os.
Among Berry's (2005) four types of acculturation strategies, our participants used assimilation when living in the United States.
The acculturation process demands that individuals navigate a commitment to their beliefs and social networks related to their home cultures while simultaneously facing the choice to adopt new values and new communities of a host culture.
An ethnographic acculturation study indicates that American TV programming may mislead Iranian immigrants to believe that Iranians are hated and discriminated in the US more than they actually are (Keshishian, 2000).
In addition to acculturation and ethnic identity, English proficiency serves as another significant component of studies on the utilization of mental health services among international students and immigrants.
Acculturative stress has been conceptualized as the stress experienced by individuals during the acculturation process, generally arising from difficulties during intercultural exchanges (Berry, 2006; Berry et al.
Based on review of abstracts and full papers, articles were retained for review if analyses reported at least one measure of acculturation and reported findings for acculturation and smoking specifically in Chinese North Americans (n = 14).
Several studies have shown that the formation of personal beliefs and values is a crucial part of becoming acculturated (Greene, Wheatley, & Aldava, 1992; Marin & Gamba, 2003); however, values are often not studied in the acculturation literature (Kim et al.
The original formulation of the acculturation gap-distress hypothesis, which was based on a unidimensional conceptualization of the acculturation process, suggested that differences in acculturation levels are most problematic when children become more highly immersed in the host culture than their parents (Lau et al.