acculturation

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acculturation

 [ah-kul″cher-a´shun]
the process of adapting or learning to take on selected behaviors of another group; change generally occurs between both cultures that are in contact.

acculturation

The process of incorporating the culture, mores and values of another group; the exchange of cultural features (traditions, values, or religious beliefs comprising the way of life) that results when groups of individuals from different cultures come into continuous direct contact, resulting in an alteration in the cultural patterns of one or both groups. While acculturation is in theory bilateral, in most instances the minority culture becomes integrated into the population’s majority culture.

Acculturation

A term which is generally defined as the exchange of cultural features (traditions, values, or religious beliefs comprising the way of life) which results when groups of individuals from different cultures come into continuous direct contact, resulting in an alteration in the cultural patterns of one or both groups. While, theoretically, acculturation can work in both directions, the norm is that the minority population is assimilated into the population’s dominant majority.

ac·cul·tur·a·tion

(ă-kŭl'chŭr-ā'shŭn)
Adaptation by a person or group to customs, values, beliefs, and behaviors of a new country or culture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recalling that materialism is more than purchase volume reminds us that acculturating individuals may increase purchases in an attempt to assimilate with a new culture without increasing levels of possessiveness, envy, and non-generosity (materialism).
This places many new teachers in training in a situation similar to that of acculturating populations all over the world.
Drawing on their own words, Lynch-Brennan (retired, New York State Education Department; PhD, history) depicts their background in Ireland, work lives, and role in acculturating the Irish in America.
Education has always played a critical role in acculturating immigrants, transforming them into American citizens.
of New York- Plattsburgh), a native of the area and a French-Canadian descendant, provides a study of French-Canadians in Lewiston, Maine, and how they retained their ethnic identity while acculturating to American society.