accident-prone


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ac·ci·dent-prone

(ak'si-dent prōn),
1. Experiencing a greater number of accidents than would be expected of the average person in similar circumstances.
2. Having personality characteristics predisposing one to accidents.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Referring to a person’s real or perceived tendency to suffer from accidents of various types
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

accident-prone

adjective Referring to a person's real or percieved tendency to suffer from accidents of various types
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ac·ci·dent-prone

(ak'si-dĕnt-prōn)
Term denoting one who suffers a greater number of accidents than an average person.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

accident-prone

Unusually liable to suffer accidents. Liability to accidents is probably no more than an effect of carelessness and lack of imaginative foresight or sometimes aggression or non-conformity.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ac·ci·dent-prone

(ak'si-dĕnt-prōn)
1. Experiencing a greater number of accidents than would be expected of the average person in similar circumstances.
2. Having personality characteristics predisposing one to accidents.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
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He stars here as Johnny English, an accident-prone secret agent who is called in to protect England's Queen and her crown jewels from Pascal Sauvage, an evil French businessman.
In an early series, "Accident-Prone," 1996, we encounter image after image of single figures--identified in digressive captions with pedigrees including the literary (Leo Bloom) and the criminal (Christine Papin, Ruth Ellis)--facing their imminent deaths in the midst of sublime landscapes.
Team members identify many potential accident-prone situations.
Diosi noticed there were conflicting viewpoints at the Sudbury conference among ergonomists, occupational health professionals and researchers as to whether or not older workers gradually become less productive on the job and more accident-prone. Some said that their reaction time in certain situations may be slightly diminished while others believed it's compensated for through workplace knowledge and experience.
He guided me through the scientific jargon of this formidable field so readers could understand the myriad problems faced by radiation workers and the public in this country riddled with leaking radioactive waste dumps, accident-prone nuclear reactors, and spent fuel pools.
The Arizona native says he began taking dance classes at age five "because I was clumsy and uncoordinated and couldn't walk across the room without tripping and falling." Clifton adds with a laugh, "But I'm still accident-prone!"
That an accident-prone homemaker was the inspiration for the original Band-Aid?