accessory spleen


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spleen

 [splēn]
a large glandlike but ductless organ in the upper part of the abdominal cavity on the left side, lateral to the cardiac end of the stomach. Called also lien. adj., adj splen´ic. It is the largest collection of reticuloendothelial cells in the body and is composed of spongelike tissue of two types: red pulp, which is the dark reddish brown substance filling the interspaces of the sinuses of the spleen, and white pulp, which consists of sheaths of lymphatic tissue surrounding the arteries of the spleen. It is enclosed in a dense capsule. In a normal adult the spleen is about 12.5 cm long and weighs about 140 to 210 g. After gastric digestion and in the presence of disease the spleen enlarges.



During fetal life the spleen and liver produce erythrocytes, but after birth that function is taken over by the bone marrow. However, if there is bone marrow failure, the spleen may again produce erythrocytes. In the normal adult the spleen is a reservoir for blood, and contains a high concentration of erythrocytes. In times of exertion, emotional stress, pregnancy, severe bleeding, carbon monoxide poisoning, or other occasions when the oxygen content of the blood must be increased, the spleen contracts rhythmically to release its store of erythrocytes into the bloodstream.

The spleen also acts to help keep the blood free of unwanted substances, including wastes and infecting organisms. The blood is delivered to it by the splenic artery, and passes through smaller branch arteries into a network of channels lined with leukocytes known as phagocytes (see reticuloendothelial system). These clear the blood of old erythrocytes, damaged cells, parasites, and other toxic or foreign substances. Hemoglobin from the removed red cells is temporarily stored.
accessory spleen a small mass of tissue elsewhere in the body, histologically and functionally identical with that composing the normal spleen.

ac·ces·so·ry spleen

[TA]
one of the small globular masses of splenic tissue occasionally found in the region of the spleen, in one of the peritoneal folds or elsewhere.

accessory spleen

splen accessorius Any of a number of small aggregates or masses of encapsulated splenic tissue located adjacent to the spleen or along the gastrosplenic ligament. See Spleen.

ac·ces·so·ry spleen

(ak-ses'ŏr-ē splēn) [TA]
One of the small globular masses of splenic tissue occasionally found in the region of the spleen, in one of the peritoneal folds, or elsewhere.
Synonym(s): lien accessorius.
References in periodicals archive ?
When submucosal lesions are present in the stomach, especially in the fundus of the stomach, the echo intensity similar to that of the spleen under EUS should alert the operators of the possible presence of an accessory spleen even when the patients have a medical history of splenectomy.
(b) CT: centimetric accessory spleen. (c) MRI: lesion (6.3 cm x 8.2 cm) characterized by heterogeneous intensity, iso-hypointense in T1.
(Sep 2010-Aug 2015) and presence of accessory spleen recorded.
(6,7) In most reports, the epidermoid cysts within intrapancreatic accessory spleen were diagnosed pathologically after the incidentalomas were surgically resected.
Semelka, "Gadolinium- and superparamagnetic-iron-oxideenhanced MR findings of intrapancreatic accessory spleen in five patients," Magnetic Resonance Imaging, vol.
Scintigraphy using Tc-99m heat-damaged red blood cells (HDRBCs) is a highly specific medium used to detect accessory spleen tissue.
Like other solid organs laparoscopy procedures, it possesses specific technical challenges.2 Some of these challenges are lack of tactile feedback,10 difficult assessment of accessory spleens,10,11 use of harmonic scalpel and endostapler10 and laparoscopic control of bleeding, and finally the removal of spleen.
The laparoscopic approach facilitated concomitant surgery and the intra-operative search for the accessory spleen. Our study showed that with early ligation of the splenic artery and delayed ligation of the splenic vein, there was minimal blood loss and bleeding during surgery and laparoscopic splenectomy was successful in all cases without conversion.
In doing so, we touched upon issues such as bleeding, conversion, splenomegaly, splenic retrieval techniques, types of instruments, hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy (HALS), complications, approaches, accessory spleen and splenosis.
Histological analysis concluded that the lesion was an intrapancreatic accessory spleen. No pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor was found in the specimen.
CASE REPORT: A middle-aged Indian male cadaver allocated for academic anatomical dissection in Department of Anatomy, RIMS, Imphal, was incidentally discovered to possess an accessory spleen during routine abdominal dissection.