accessory canal


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ac·ces·so·ry ca·nal

in the tooth, a channel leading from the root pulp laterally through the dentin to the periodontal tissue; may be found anywhere in the tooth root but is more common in the apical third of the root.
Synonym(s): lateral canal

ac·ces·so·ry ca·nal

(ak-sesŏr-ē kă-nal)
In the tooth, channel leading from the root pulp laterally through dentin to the periodontal tissue; may be found anywhere in the tooth root but is more common in apical third of the root.
Synonym(s): lateral canal.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is easier for students and trainees to present their cases using a system that defines the tooth number, root and configuration of the main and accessory canal morphology without referring to Latin numerals.
Despite the detailed information provided when using the new coding system, it does not provide information with regards to the shape (such as round and oval), size (narrow and wide) of the root canal system, degree of root and canal curvatures and several other sophisticated anatomical landmarks of accessory canal morphology [such as dimensions and tortuosity (34)] and developmental anomalies (such as depth/dimensions of palato-gingival grooves, morphological cross sections of C-shaped canals).
The presence of accessory canals was examined in longitudinal sections.
Other parameters such as accessory canals, the shape of the access cavity at CEJ (Figure 2), root diameter, and dentine thickness (Figure 3) are tabulated in Tables 3, 4, 5, and 6, respectively.
Pertaining to histology of the removed apices, accessory canals (ramifications) were observed in 6 roots.
Scanning electron microscopy was utilized to evaluate the presence of foramina of accessory canals, which was found to be as much as 64% of specimens.
Obturation of accessory canals after four different final irrigation regimes.
These failures are mostly designated to the presence of accessory canals in the periapical delta and constant release of bacterial by products and their toxins from the necrotic pulp.1,2 With the advancement in surgical techniques, apical resection procedure is now standardized and is the last resort to salvage such teeth.1,2,3
But the main communication between the pulp and the periodontium in incisors with a radicular groove is probably the accessory canals, which might be anywhere along the groove.
[2], [5], [8], [10-15] The diffusion through dentinal tubules, apical foramen, secondary and accessory canals allows the calcium hydroxide to reach regions contaminated by microorganisms, areas of root resorption and surrounding tissues, promoting its antimicrobial and anti-resorptive action.