access

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access

 [ak´ses]
a means of approaching something.
arteriovenous access the usual type of vascular access, connecting an artery and a vein, usually in the arm.
hemodialysis access (vascular access) the means by which hemodialysis apparatus is connected to blood vessels; the most common type is arteriovenous access. Other types include venovenous access and types of fistulas and shunts.
venovenous access vascular access via a tube that begins at a vein and ends at a vein, used in hemodialysis and continuous venovenous hemofiltration.

ac·cess

(ak'ses), Do not confuse this word with assess or axis.
1. A way or means of approach or admittance.
2. In dentistry, the space required for visualization and for manipulation of instruments to remove decay and prepare a tooth for restoration.
3. The opening in the crown of a tooth required to allow adequate admittance to the pulp space to clean, shape, and seal the root canal(s).
Synonym(s): access opening
[L. accessus]

Access

Access

Intensive care/Lab
The ease with which a patient’s circulation (vasculature) can be accessed for drawing blood or administering fluids, nutrients, etc. 
Managed care
(1) The ability of an individual or group of individuals to obtain health insurance.
(2) The ability of an individual to obtain adequate or appropriate health care services; the availability of medical care to a patient, which can be determined by location, transportation, type of medical services in the area, etc.
MedspeakUK A generic UK term referring to the facility with which people receive the information, health care or social services they need and are not discouraged from seeking help.
Access issues Distance travelled; physical access (e.g. premises suitable for wheelchairs); communication (e.g., information in Braille/large print/foreign languages and other formats); and provision of culturally appropriate services.
Psychiatry The ability of an individual or group to receive needed mental health services.

ACCESS

Cardiology
(1) Acute Candesartan Cilexetil Evaluation in Stroke Survivors. An aborted trial that evaluated the pros of immediate blood pressure reduction in patients with acute stroke and severe hypertension.
Conclusion A short course of candesartan after acute stroke reduced cardiovascular mortality and morbidity.
(2) Atorvastatin Comparative Cholesterol Efficacy & Safety Study. A trial comparing the safety and efficacy of 5 statins in reducing LDL cholesterol to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) target level.
Conclusion Significantly more patients receiving atorvastatin achieved their NCEP goals at 1 year (86%), than with simvastatin (77%), pravastatin (69%), lovastatin (63%) and fluvastatin (54%); no clinically significant tolerability or safety issues were seen with any of the drugs.
(3) A Comparison of Percutaneous Entry Sites for Coronary Angioplasty; A Randomised Comparison of Transradial, Brachial, and Femoral Coronary Angioplasty with 6F Guide Catheters. A trial comparing vascular complications and late clinical outcome of patients undergoing coronary interventions via the radial, brachial or femoral approach.
Primary endpoint Entry-site vascular complications; 1-month MACE (major acute coronary events)
Conclusion Access failure is more common with transradial PTCA; outcomes are otherwise similar.
Pulmonary medicine A Case Control Etiological Study of Sarcoidosis. An epidemiologic study of sarcoidosis. Data from a heterogeneous US population indicate that sarcoidosis tends to improve or remain stable for over 2 years in most patients.

access

Health care
1. The ability of an individual or group of individuals to obtain health insurance.
2. The ability of an individual to obtain adequate or appropriate health care services; the availability of medical care to a Pt, which can be determined by location, transportation, type of medical services in the area, etc. See Direct access, Health care access Intensive care See Vascular access.
Access to health care, factors in
Geographic or logistic factors,
eg rural communities have poor access to medical attention, due to a relative lack of providers
Finances
or ability to pay for services and
Other factors:
ethnic, social and psychiatric aspects of the person seeking health care
.
.
.

ac·cess

(ak'ses)
1. A way or means of approach or admittance.
2. The space required for visualization and for manipulation of instruments to remove decay and prepare a tooth for restoration.
3. The opening in the crown of a tooth required to allow adequate admittance to the pulp space to clean, shape, and seal the root canal(s) during endodontic or root canal therapy.
4. A patient's entry into health care process; admittance and ability to get care.
[L. accessus]

ac·cess

(ak'ses) Do not confuse this word with assess or axis.
1. In dentistry, space required for visualization and manipulation of instruments to remove decay and prepare a tooth for restoration.
2. Synonym(s): access cavity.
3. A way or means of approach or admittance.
Synonym(s): access opening.
[L. accessus]

Patient discussion about access

Q. ex-wife works in hospital and accesses my and my familys medical records what can i/we do about this legally this is done without any consent she has computer acess to any records and accesses them upon her own

A. If you are sure of this she is breaking the law...Hippa protects patient right and this is a clear voliation of those right. I suggest you get a copy of the hospitals Right to Privacy , HIPPA paperwork. Then If you can prove this write a letter to hospital admenistration and one to her supervisor and/or director. Let them know you know this is a violation of patient rights and you want it dealt with immediatly or you will seek out legal council. They should responded to your letter in avery timely matter. If you do not have proof discuss with someone in medical record about the "need to know" bases and if ther eis no reason for her to know this information( she could be one tha thas to put it on your records) you would like to be assured she has no access to them and if she is doing a job that would give her the right ask that they please have someone else in the department handle you and your family dure to personal reasons. I encourage you to handle this in a very proffesi

More discussions about access
References in periodicals archive ?
While origin server is overloaded by numerical simultaneous accesses from direct clients, indirect client accesses to cache server.
As mentioned at the end of Section 3, experiments in Section 4 are achieved using hard coded IP addresses to recognize priority accesses. In order to append and remove cache servers provided on cloud environment dynamically, we develop Priority Access Management Mechanism which registers appended cache server to Priority Access Mechanism as priority host and deletes registration information of remove cache server.
If a client that does not have global IP address and access Web server using NAT, and registered as a priority client, accesses from other clients that share global IP address with registered clients are also recognized as priority access.
Status page shows list of IP addresses in IPArray and priority keys in PC-Array, and the number of accesses in each queue.
A user who wants to get priority cookie accesses Authentication CGI.
The user can access destination page prior to normal accesses.
We create status page which shows the number of accesses in each queue.

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