surgery

(redirected from access flap in osseous surgery)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

surgery

 [sur´jer-e]
1. the branch of health science that treats diseases, injuries, and deformities by manual or operative methods.
2. the place where operative procedures are performed.
3. in Great Britain, a room or office where a doctor sees and treats patients.
4. the work performed by a surgeon; see also operation and procedure. adj., adj sur´gical.
ambulatory surgery any operative procedure not requiring an overnight stay in the hospital; it must be carefully planned to ensure that all necessary diagnostic tests are completed prior to admission. Discharge instructions must place a high priority on patient safety. Called also day surgery.
bench surgery surgery performed on an organ that has been removed from the body, after which it is reimplanted.
day surgery ambulatory surgery.
maxillofacial surgery oral and maxillofacial s.
minimal access surgery (minimally invasive surgery) a surgical procedure done in a manner that causes little or no trauma or injury to the patient, such as through a cannula using lasers, endoscopes, or laparoscopes; compared with other procedures, those in this category involve less bleeding, smaller amounts of anesthesia, less pain, and minimal scarring.
open heart surgery surgery that involves incision into one or more chambers of the heart, such as for repair or palliation of congenital heart defects, repair or replacement of defective heart valves, or coronary artery bypass.
oral and maxillofacial surgery that branch of dental practice that deals with the diagnosis and the surgical and adjunctive treatment of diseases, injuries, and defects of the human mouth and dental structures. Called also maxillofacial or oral surgery.
orthopedic surgery orthopedics.
plastic surgery see plastic surgery.
stereotaxic surgery the production of sharply localized lesions in the brain after precise localization of the target tissue by use of three-dimensional coordinates.

sur·ger·y

(sŭr'jĕr-ē),
1. The branch of medicine concerned with the treatment of disease, injury, and deformity by physical operation or manipulation.
2. The performance or procedures of an operation.
[L. chirurgia; G. cheir, hand, + ergon, work]

surgery

(sûr′jə-rē)
n. pl. surger·ies
1. The branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of injury, deformity, and disease by the use of instruments.
2.
a. Treatment based on such medicine, typically involving the removal or replacement of diseased tissue by cutting: The athlete had surgery on his knee.
b. A procedure that is part of this treatment; an operation: The doctor performed three surgeries this morning.
3. An operating room or a laboratory of a surgeon or of a hospital's surgical staff: How long has the patient been in surgery?
4. Chiefly British
a. A physician's, dentist's, or veterinarian's office.
b. The period during which a physician, dentist, or veterinarian consults with or treats patients in the office.

surgery

Medspeak
An intervention in which a body site is accessed via an incision on a mucocutaneous surface, most commonly the skin, and tissue excised, added to or manipulated to manage an injury, or to revise or renovate a failing part or aesthetically enhance the tissue’s owner.

Medspeak-UK
A place where a doctor, dentist or other healthcare practitioner treats or advises patients.

surgery

1. That branch of 'procedural' medicine which addresses physical defects and/or acquired lesions by operative design.
2. Any procedure to remove or repair damaged tissues or diagnose disease. See Abdominal surgery, Band-Aid surgery, Beating heart surgery, Billboard surgery, Brain-graft surgery, Cancer surgery, Cataract surgery, Cardiothoracic surgery, Cardiovascular surgery, Chemosurgery, Conservative surgery, Cosmetic surgery, Cranial base surgery, Craniofacial surgery, Debulking surgery, Dermatologic surgery, Dry run surgery, Disfiguring surgery, Elective surgery, Emergency surgery, Esthetic surgery, Facial plastic & reconstructive surgery, Functional (endonasal) endoscopic sinus surgery, Ghost surgery, Hand surgery, Hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, Head & neck surgery, Heart port surgery, Heroic surgery, Image-directed surgery, Keyhole surgery, Kiss of death surgery, Laparoscopic surgery, Laser surgery, Love surgery, Lung-reduction surgery, Major surgery, Mastoid surgery, MIDCAB surgery, Minimally invasive surgery, Minimally invasive cardiac surgery, Minimally invasive valve surgery, Minor surgery, Mohs surgery, Mutilating surgery, Neurosurgery surgery, Nintendo® surgery, No problem surgery, Open heart surgery, Optional surgery, Outpatient surgery, Palliative surgery, Perineal surgery, Phonosurgery, Port access surgery, Psychosurgery, Radiation surgery, Radical surgery, Radioimmunoguided surgery, Reconstructive surgery, Re-do vascular surgery, Refractive surgery, Required surgery, Robotic surgery, Roller ball surgery, Same-day surgery, Second-look surgery, Stereotactic radiosurgery, Thoracic surgery, Tommy John elbow surgery, Unnecessary surgery, Urgent surgery, Videotaped surgery.

sur·ger·y

(sŭr'jĕr-ē)
1. The branch of medicine concerned with the treatment of disease, injury, and deformity by operation or manipulation.
2. The performance or procedures of a surgical operation.
[L. chirurgia; G. cheir, hand, + ergon, work]

surgery

1. The treatment of disease, injury and deformity by physical, manual or instrumental interventions.
2. The diagnosis of conditions treated in this way.
3. The practice of operative treatment.
4. A room or suite used for medical consultation and treatment. From the Greek cheirourgia , hand work, as in cheir , hand and ergon , work.

sur·ger·y

(sŭr'jĕr-ē)
1. Branch of medicine concerned with treatment of disease, injury, and deformity by physical operation or manipulation.
2. Performance or procedures of an operation.
[L. chirurgia; G. cheir, hand, + ergon, work]

Patient discussion about surgery

Q. I am worried how safe the operation would be and the post surgery complications? My wife has a cyst in her right breast and further tests are going on. Doctors have advised to go for an operation. I am worried how safe the operation would be and the post surgery complications?

A. My friend, surgery for the cyst in breast is common. Any cyst in breast indicates breast cancer. These surgeries are very safe. Initially they used to cut the complete breast to remove the cyst. Now with the advanced technology, only the cyst would be removed without harming other tissues. Rather complete removal is done these days, but that depend upon the severity of the cancer. These surgeries are proven with results. If the cyst is less they will remove only the affected portion and yes they do remove some nearby tissues because there some cancer cells may lay and can arrive again. For any post surgery complications, chemotherapy treatment is also available.

Q. Should I do surgery for varicoceles? I went to an urologist and he recommended surgery, but I don’t know if I should do this…is it dangerous? Can I live with the varicocele?

A. I don’t see your problem, you said an urologist advised you to do so- that should be enough no? if you don’t trust him, go and get a second opinion. The surgery is not that bad, an hour later and you are walking out. Vary small risk of complication. I did it and it was fine.

Q. What types of gastric bypass surgeries are there? I heard all sorts of options for gastric bypass are available. What is the most in use?

A. Bariatric surgeries or – gastric bypass surgeries for weight loss fall into three categories: Restrictive procedures make the stomach smaller to limit the amount of food intake, malabsorptive techniques reduce the amount of intestine that comes in contact with food so that the body absorbs fewer calories, and combination operations employ both restriction and malabsorption. The exact one to be done should be decided with the physician according to each patients abilities and pre-operative function level.

More discussions about surgery