acceptable risk


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Related to acceptable risk: Risk assessment

acceptable risk

EBM
The risk in a clinical trial that is regarded as justifiable based on a cost-benefits analysis, which differs depending on the condition for which a product is being tested. A product for sore throat, for example, will be expected to have few side effects; on the other hand, adverse side effects would be an acceptable risk for a drug that manages a life-threatening and rapidly evolving condition (e.g., stage-IV melanoma).

Public health
The degree to which the probability of suffering disease or injury under a specific set of circumstances is viewed as being reasonable by an individual, group or society in exchange for the benefits of using a particular substance or process (which may cause said disease or injury). Acceptability of risk depends on scientific data; social, economic and political factors; and on the perceived benefits arising from a chemical or process that creates the risk in question.

Acceptable Risk

The risk in a clinical trial that is regarded as justifiable, based on a cost-benefit analysis, which differs depending on the condition for which a product is being tested. A product for sore throat, for example, will be expected to have few side effects. On the other hand, adverse side effects would be an acceptable risk for a drug that manages a life-threatening and rapidly evolving condition—e.g., stage IV melanoma.

acceptable risk

A tolerable level of harm or potential harm.
See also: risk

risk

the chance of an unfavorable event occurring.

acceptable risk
risk for which the benefits rank larger than the potential hazards.
at risk
that part of a total population which is subject to the disease being reviewed, e.g. only milking cows are at risk to milk fever, only grazing cows to enzootic nasal granuloma.
risk aversion
reluctance to take risks.
risk factor
an attribute or exposure which increases the probability of occurrence of a disease or other outcome.
risk premium
the amount of money required to convince a person to take a specific risk.
risk ratio
the ratio of two risks.
relative risk
see relative risk.
specified risk materials
a term used in the US to denote tissues that can be infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), namely brain and spinal cord, spinal ganglia, retina, and terminal small intestine. Banned from inclusion in any feed stuff.
surgical risk
an animal that has poor general health and must be assessed as a poor survival risk to undergo major surgery or anesthesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new edition further characterizes a manufacturer's policy for determining acceptable risk as "essential" and recommends, as one option, matrices (examples provided in Annex D), which document the combinations of probability of harm and severity of harm that are acceptable or unacceptable.
Sceptical CFOs can only be won around with this sort of justification and the language of acceptable risk.
This process is at an early stage and we will only invest in this area if we are confident that such a move would create shareholder value at an acceptable risk.
Singh acknowledged that the government formed by his United Progressive Alliance took some risk in announcing the partial pullout of troops from Jammu and Kashmir, but said it was an acceptable risk.
A guide to the determination of acceptable risk and realistic performance objectives is followed by a discussion to establish the effectiveness of current codes to achieve acceptable performance.
Toxic air pollution creates a cancer risk for Connecticut citizens that is 850 times greater than the acceptable risk set by the EPA," says the alliance.
The DOE said the cleanup falls into the EPA's acceptable risk range of one in a million to one in 10,000 additional cancers from exposure to radiation on the site.
In combat, the specific mission objectives may make the level of acceptable risk fairly clear.
but, regarding trees, there is usually a sense that not much can be done, that chances of hazard tree accidents are remote enough to be an acceptable risk, or the love of trees outweighs the hazards.
Defining what is and is not an acceptable risk is the legacy of AIDS treatment activism.
Warren argues that during the debates throughout the century, the definition of acceptable risk had to be negotiated and this negotiation was often controlled by industry, which funded the scientific research on which acceptable blood lead levels were determined.
Acceptable Risk by Sarah Lichtenstein, Baruch Fischoff, and Stephen Darby, Cambridge University Press, 40 W.