acceleration

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acceleration

 [ak-sel″er-a´shun]
1. a quickening, as of the pulse rate.
2. in physics, the time rate of change of velocity.
psychomotor acceleration generalized physical and emotional overactivity in response to internal and external stimuli, such as that seen in the manic phase of bipolar disorder.

ac·cel·er·a·tion

(ak-sel-er-ā'shŭn), Avoid the mispronunciation uh-sel-er-ā'shŭn.
1. The act of accelerating.
2. The rate of increase in velocity per unit of time; commonly expressed in g units; also expressed in centimeters or feet per second squared.
3. The rate of increasing deviation from a rectilinear course.
[see accelerator]

acceleration

[aksel′ərā′shən]
Etymology: L, accelerare, to quicken
an increase in the speed or velocity of an object or reaction. Compare deceleration. accelerate, v.

ac·cel·er·a·tion

(ak-selĕr-āshŭn)
The rate of change of velocity.

acceleration

change in motion of a body or object: the rate of change of velocity with respect to time. linear acceleration: the rate of change in linear velocity with respect to time; related to force by Newton's second law of motion (often stated as force = mass×linear acceleration). Measured in metres per second squared (m.s-2). angular acceleration: the rate of change in angular velocity with respect to time. Measured in degrees per second squared (°. s -2) or radians per second squared (rad.s-2); related to moment by Newton's second angular law of motion (moment = moment of inertia×angular acceleration). tangential acceleration: the acceleration of an object or body acting at a tangent to its direction of motion, e.g. when it is moving in a circle or around a curve. instantaneous acceleration: acceleration measured over a very short (infinitesimal) period of time, effectively a continuous measurement of acceleration. See also gravitational acceleration.

acceleration,

n in osteopathy, the process of increasing speed or velocity of a manipulative technique.

ac·cel·er·a·tion

(ak-sel-er-ā'shŭn) Avoid the mispronunciation uh-sel-er-ā'shŭn.
1. The act of accelerating.
2. The rate of increase in velocity per unit of time; commonly expressed in g units; also expressed in centimeters or feet per second squared.
3. The rate of increasing deviation from a rectilinear course.

Patient discussion about acceleration

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http://www.arthritis.org/at-supplement-guide.php

More discussions about acceleration
References in periodicals archive ?
1994) Evaluation of the Bede Polding College Accelerative Learning Program (Yr 11).
The pack's spring-suspension system reduces the accelerative force by about 30 percent, Rome says.
The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 2(1 & 2), 36-62.
According to Friedel (1980) the accelerative component is of significance only in evaporating or condensing flows and may be neglected when no phase change occurs.
European drivers question the durability of CVT belts and prefer the greater economy, accelerative capacity, and sportiness of DCTs.
16) Per quanto riguarda l'uso della gestualita in rapporto all'apprendimento di una lingua seconda nei primi anni di scuola, va senz'altro segnalato il Gesture Approach (GA) sviluppato da Wendy Maxwell nell'ambito del suo Accelerative Integrated Method (AIM) per lo studio del francese.
Switch on your mind: accelerative learning strategies at work.
WaveCrest's propulsion system consists of an electric Adaptive Motor system, which delivers both accelerative and regenerative power at each drive wheel on demand, coupled to customizable controls and advanced battery technology.
As a result, recent behavioral research has not focused on understanding the etiology of tics, but rather understanding the accelerative and decelerative effects of environmental events on their occurrence.
A few days later, I flew the remaining training and data runs with LAMARS accelerative motion.
The accelerative bursts which see defenders turning uneasily on their heels were missing,as was the sense of nervousness his presence creates in opposition defences.
At the same time, it will minimize the dangerous accelerative forces, making the activity much safer.

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