acceleration

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acceleration

 [ak-sel″er-a´shun]
1. a quickening, as of the pulse rate.
2. in physics, the time rate of change of velocity.
psychomotor acceleration generalized physical and emotional overactivity in response to internal and external stimuli, such as that seen in the manic phase of bipolar disorder.

ac·cel·er·a·tion

(ak-sel-er-ā'shŭn), Avoid the mispronunciation uh-sel-er-ā'shŭn.
1. The act of accelerating.
2. The rate of increase in velocity per unit of time; commonly expressed in g units; also expressed in centimeters or feet per second squared.
3. The rate of increasing deviation from a rectilinear course.
[see accelerator]

acceleration

[aksel′ərā′shən]
Etymology: L, accelerare, to quicken
an increase in the speed or velocity of an object or reaction. Compare deceleration. accelerate, v.

ac·cel·er·a·tion

(ak-selĕr-āshŭn)
The rate of change of velocity.

acceleration

change in motion of a body or object: the rate of change of velocity with respect to time. linear acceleration: the rate of change in linear velocity with respect to time; related to force by Newton's second law of motion (often stated as force = mass×linear acceleration). Measured in metres per second squared (m.s-2). angular acceleration: the rate of change in angular velocity with respect to time. Measured in degrees per second squared (°. s -2) or radians per second squared (rad.s-2); related to moment by Newton's second angular law of motion (moment = moment of inertia×angular acceleration). tangential acceleration: the acceleration of an object or body acting at a tangent to its direction of motion, e.g. when it is moving in a circle or around a curve. instantaneous acceleration: acceleration measured over a very short (infinitesimal) period of time, effectively a continuous measurement of acceleration. See also gravitational acceleration.

acceleration,

n in osteopathy, the process of increasing speed or velocity of a manipulative technique.

ac·cel·er·a·tion

(ak-sel-er-ā'shŭn) Avoid the mispronunciation uh-sel-er-ā'shŭn.
1. The act of accelerating.
2. The rate of increase in velocity per unit of time; commonly expressed in g units; also expressed in centimeters or feet per second squared.
3. The rate of increasing deviation from a rectilinear course.

Patient discussion about acceleration

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More discussions about acceleration
References in periodicals archive ?
The Accelerative Integrated Method: A Holistic Approach to the Teaching of French as a Second Language.
This was not true during the simulation runs with accelerative motion.
Since momentum reduces muscular tension, it can limit total motor unit recruitment and also increase accelerative forces that can potentially create muscle and/or joint injury.
This is finitude's openness to where it cannot go, but before which it stands and is not demeaned: scarcity of relation preserves the horizon of finitude, an encounter with a mode of being not fully itself, but becomingly itself rather than locked into any accelerative becoming.
Tangential velocity followed a bell-shaped pattern in which the decelerative part was slightly longer than the accelerative part, probably due to the utilization of visual and/or proprioceptive information in the second part of the movement.
Not every gifted child requires acceleration and not all require to be grouped with students of similar abilities but, for those who do, there exists a smorgasbord of research-supported grouping and accelerative procedures from which the school can choose those that meet the child's specific academic and socio-affective characteristics and needs.
famous for accelerative learning courses such as "The Accounting Game.
The authors reported that peak accelerative forces measured while subjects "plopped down into a chair" were similar to accelerative forces recorded during published accounts of volunteer crash testing.
The newly elected Wilson and his minions predicted disaster because of the base closings; instead, the economy took off as California re-emerged as one of the global leaders of this Accelerative Age, the epicenter of Milkenism, Murdochism and Wiredism.
Hensley, while stressing the economy's anomalous behavior, suspects that at worst the immediate future may bring increased wage pressures, which he doubts will be as accelerative as they've been in the past, and other "manageable" bumps.
Fox, "An Accelerative Intervention Program for Mathematically Gifted Girls.
Einstein's gravitation theory is a kind of unification theory: it asserts that the inertial properties which Newton had blamed on spacetime, and the accelerative properties which he had blamed on gravity, are really aspects of the same structure.

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