acantholysis


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acantholysis

 [ak″an-thol´ĭ-sis]
disruption of the intercellular connections between keratinocytes of the epidermis, caused by lysis of intercellular cement substance. It is associated with the formation of epidermal vesicles in such conditions as pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus, and other skin disorders.

ac·an·thol·y·sis

(ak-an-thol'i-sis), Avoid the mispronunciation acantholy'sis.
Separation of individual epidermal keratinocytes from their neighbor, as in conditions such as pemphigus vulgaris and Darier disease.
[acantho- + G. lysis, loosening]

acantholysis

A histologically defined condition characterised by a pathologic disruption of intercellular bridges between keratinocytes in the squamous epithelium of mucocutaneous surfaces, resulting in intraepithelial vesication and/or separation of the epithelium from the subjacent dermis.

Acantholysis is a misnomer that is retained because it paraphrases a process that cannot be fully defined at the molecular level. It has been applied to a variety of unrelated conditions that share the loss of intraepidermal cohesion, including those in which the loss is clearly the consequence of severe cell damage.

acantholysis

Dermatology The pathologic disruption of intercellular bridges between keratinocytes in the squamous epithelium of mucocutaneous surfaces, resulting in intraepithelial vesicles Diseases with Pemphigus vulgaris, benign familial pemphigus (Hailey-Hailey disease), Darier's disease, staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome. See Pemphigus vulgaris, Tombstone appearance.

ac·an·thol·y·sis

(ak'an-thol'i-sis)
Separation of individual epidermal keratinocytes from their neighbors, as in conditions such as pemphigus vulgaris and Darier disease.
[acantho- + G. lysis, loosening]

acantholysis

Splitting apart of layers of cells in the epidermis often top form a blister.

ac·an·thol·y·sis

(ak'an-thol'i-sis)
Separation of individual epidermal keratinocytes from their neighbors.
[acantho- + G. lysis, loosening]
References in periodicals archive ?
Histopathologically, there is extensive partial loss of coherence between suprabasal keratinocytes (acantholysis) producing a 'dilapidated brick wall' appearance and clusters of loosely coherent cells float within suprabasal clefts.4
Other reports demonstrated that inhibitors of caspases provoke the blockade of acantholysis [11].
Immunohistochemistry for IgG4 exhibited a higher sensitivity in pemphigus cases with active acantholysis. Of the 12 pemphigus vulgaris specimens, 10 displayed acantholytic lesions, in which 8 specimens showed positive immunostains for IgG4 (sensitivity 80.0%).
Biopsy from papular lesions showed suprabasal acantholysis, acantholytic and dyskeratotic cells.
Histology showed hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis with some areas showing intraepidermal vesiculation and acantholysis similar to Hailey-Hailey disease, while other areas were more like Darier's disease showing dyskeratotic cells throughout the epidermis, including Corps ronds and grains.
Histologically, the acantholysis seen in Grover disease occurs in a variety of different patterns in small, circumscribed foci resembling Darier-White disease, pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceous, Hailey-Hailey disease, and a spongiotic dermatitis.
3 a & 3b Showing hyperkeratosis & suprabasal acantholysis in case 2.
The commonest histopathological feature was hyperkeratosis seen in 100% patients, suprabasal acantholysis was seen in 90% patients, acantholytic cells were seen in 86.6% patients and corps ronds and grains were seen in 83.3% patients.
These tumors represent squamous cell carcinoma of lobular growth in which there is considerable dyskeratosis with individual cell keratinization resulting in acantholysis in the centre of the lobular formation.
The histologic findings on skin biopsies of Darier's disease show acantholysis (loss of epidermal adhesion) and dyskeratosis (abnormal keratinization) as the 2 main features.
Key Words: Autoimmune bullous disease, acantholysis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigod, subepidermal bullous disease
Many cells of the detached stratum malphighii shows loss of intercellular bridges leading to acantholysis. Despite acantholysis the cells in the lacuae have few intact intercellular bridges giving a dilapidated brick wall appearance.