abuse liability


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abuse liability

The propensity of a drug to produce compulsive use, to cause addiction.
See also: liability
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite these limitations, these findings add substantially to our understanding of e-cigarette abuse liability. Although e-cigarette users were found to be nicotine dependent, biochemical measures of carbon monoxide and self-reported questionnaires found nicotine dependence on e-cigarettes to be lower than was observed in tobacco cigarette smokers.
The FDA made it clear that Zohydro shows strong enough efficacy in reducing pain and suffering when weighed against its potential abuse liability.
Rachel Wightman of New York University and her colleagues did a review of the literature on "opioid likeability" and "opioid abuse liability" (J.
Hence, it was the purpose of the present study to evaluate the effect of Silexan in rats trained to discriminate diazepam from saline, with a view to establish whether the essential oil would be recognized as diazepam-like and by extension may possess a similar abuse liability.
The relative abuse liability of oral oxycodone, hydrocodone and hydromorphone assessed in prescription opioid users.
However, the company won t abandon its dominance in the human abuse liability sector, helping pharmaceutical companies develop medications for pain that are less likely to be abused.
Sexual and physical abuse liability is a must on any child care policy.
In contrast, a unique feature of P2D's lead ADHD compounds is that they demonstrate no abuse potential in the 'Gold Standard' of preclinical abuse liability testing."
The available buprenorphine-naloxone preparations have significant abuse liability and have a long history of diversion for illicit use.
Bernstein, "Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies for Drugs with Abuse Liability: Public Interest, Special Interest, Conflicts of Interest and the Industry Perspective," Ann.
Risk evaluation and mitigation strategies for drugs with abuse liability. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1141, 284-303 doi: 10.1196/annals.1441.026
The newer alpha-1-selective benzodiazepine receptor agonists (zolpidem, zaleplon, and eszopiclone) and the older nonselective benzodiazepines (such as flurazepam, temazepam, and triazolam) share an equivalent range of abuse liability. (18) Consequently, all benzodiazepine receptor agonists are classified as Schedule IV controlled substances and should be used with caution, if at all, in substance-abusing or substance-dependent patients (Table 2).