abstract

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abstract

 [ab´strakt]
1. a short description of a scientific presentation or article.
2. a thought process that is oriented toward the development of an idea without application to, or association with, a particular instance. This type of thinking is independent of time and space.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt),
1. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. A condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

Abstract

Informatics A statement summarising the important points of a text; a brief summary or description of the essential content of an article, chapter or other complete work, often written by the author of the work.
Research
(1) A synopsis of research data that may be presented at scientific meetings and later published in a peer-reviewed journal; abstracts may not be subjected to the same rigorous review as the “lead” articles for the same journal; the purpose of the abstract is to enable the reader to efficiently grasp the essence of the report; the abstract can be very misleading; it is often the only part of the content of an article that will show up in a database.  
(2) A distillation of a presentation at a meeting, congress, conference, symposium, colloquium, seminar, workshop, round table, or other professional gathering.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. A condensation, summary, or brief description of a scientific or literary article or the results of a study.
2. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating it with milk sugar.
3. (ăb-strakt') To collect information from the medical record for research, billing, or statistical purposes.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. Preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. Condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
A theme covered in the abstract could be an inaccurate representation of the original because of an intellectual error (the abstractor misinterprets the text) or an error of carelessness (the abstractor records incorrectly--e.g., gives a wrong numerical value).
The readability of an abstract is determined by the ability of the abstractor to express himself clearly, concisely, and unambiguously, by the rules or guidelines under which he operates, and by the format of the abstract (e.g., some claim that abstracts structured into paragraphs with topical headings are easier to comprehend).
In addition to Manatt, the group of organizers includes Dannie Brown, retired vice president of Brown-Taylor Lumber Co.; Donald Hedden, pharmacist; Gary Hines of Municipal Pipe & Supply Co.; Bobby Jeffrey, retired manager of International Paper Co.; James Lancaster, state representative for District 48; Mary Nixon, executive secretary for Abstractors Board of Examiners; Shelby Taylor, of Shelby Taylor Trucking; Alvin Upton, co-owner of Buy-Rite Foods Inc.; David Wells, majority owner of South Arkansas Telephone Co.; and William Winston, president of Pulpwood Products Co.