abstract

(redirected from abstractor)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

abstract

 [ab´strakt]
1. a short description of a scientific presentation or article.
2. a thought process that is oriented toward the development of an idea without application to, or association with, a particular instance. This type of thinking is independent of time and space.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt),
1. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. A condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstract

[ab′strakt, abstrakt′]
Etymology: L, abstrahere, to drag away
1 a condensed summary of a scientific article, literary piece, or address.
2 to collect data such as from a medical record.
3 a preparation containing the soluble principles of a medication concentration mixed with lactose.
4 difficult to understand because of lack of practicality.

Abstract

Informatics A statement summarising the important points of a text; a brief summary or description of the essential content of an article, chapter or other complete work, often written by the author of the work.
Research
(1) A synopsis of research data that may be presented at scientific meetings and later published in a peer-reviewed journal; abstracts may not be subjected to the same rigorous review as the “lead” articles for the same journal; the purpose of the abstract is to enable the reader to efficiently grasp the essence of the report; the abstract can be very misleading; it is often the only part of the content of an article that will show up in a database.  
(2) A distillation of a presentation at a meeting, congress, conference, symposium, colloquium, seminar, workshop, round table, or other professional gathering.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. A condensation, summary, or brief description of a scientific or literary article or the results of a study.
2. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating it with milk sugar.
3. (ăb-strakt') To collect information from the medical record for research, billing, or statistical purposes.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. Preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. Condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
A theme covered in the abstract could be an inaccurate representation of the original because of an intellectual error (the abstractor misinterprets the text) or an error of carelessness (the abstractor records incorrectly--e.
The current expansion adds over 34 established field abstractors to the SmartProp nationwide abstractor network.
The integration of OS Abstractor and SOSCOE provides valuable OS independence to SOSCOE's applications.
Employment and wages for workers who help with home buying and selling Occupations Employment, Median annual wage, 2010 (1) May 2011 (2) Home marketing and sales Real estate brokers 98,600 $59,340 Real estate sales agents 367,500 39,070 Secretaries and administrative 66,300 29,270 assistants, except legal, medical, and executive (3) Inspection and repair Construction and building 102,400 53,180 inspectors General maintenance and 237,500 30,950 repair workers (3) Loans and insurance Loan officers 289,400 58,030 Insurance claims and policy 248,100 35,210 processing clerks Appraisal and law Appraisers and assessors 77,800 48,870 of real estate Title examiners, abstractors, 59,000 40,760 and searchers (1) Employment data are for wage-and-salary and self-employed workers.
One hundred twenty-five contributing abstractors under the direction of editors working over a period of three decades have amassed a bibliography that bares new paths for the history of musical scholarship as a field of study.
Delivering more than 2 million images per day, Data Tree's system is a reliable solution for businesses that perform land record searches, including title companies, abstractors, real estate attorneys, creditors, mortgage lenders, civil engineers and more.
People called title searchers or abstractors do the grunt work of inspecting public and private sources for evidence of title problems or claims upon the property.
In the past, we would send abstractors out to court-houses and other repositories of real estate information These individuals research and obtain the requested in formation and return it to us.
The functioning of these writing-assistance tools should, however, be designed specially to fit the needs of abstractors.
Several studies have examined attempts at shortcuts around the training and counseling components; all studies suggest that medical record abstractors perform very poorly compared with infection control practitioners in case-finding for nosocomial infections (9).
The language of the court was unmistakable in its regret at having most of us believing that the ELR was going to forever insulate design professionals from the same kind of scrutiny received by title abstractors in First American Title Insurance Co.
Professions such as abstractors of title and trade association executives, often ignored in other such books, are included here.