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abstract

 [ab´strakt]
1. a short description of a scientific presentation or article.
2. a thought process that is oriented toward the development of an idea without application to, or association with, a particular instance. This type of thinking is independent of time and space.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt),
1. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. A condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

Abstract

Informatics A statement summarising the important points of a text; a brief summary or description of the essential content of an article, chapter or other complete work, often written by the author of the work.
Research
(1) A synopsis of research data that may be presented at scientific meetings and later published in a peer-reviewed journal; abstracts may not be subjected to the same rigorous review as the “lead” articles for the same journal; the purpose of the abstract is to enable the reader to efficiently grasp the essence of the report; the abstract can be very misleading; it is often the only part of the content of an article that will show up in a database.  
(2) A distillation of a presentation at a meeting, congress, conference, symposium, colloquium, seminar, workshop, round table, or other professional gathering.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. A condensation, summary, or brief description of a scientific or literary article or the results of a study.
2. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating it with milk sugar.
3. (ăb-strakt') To collect information from the medical record for research, billing, or statistical purposes.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. Preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. Condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypothesis 1: Event abstractness will amplify differences in self-other risk perception, such that the differences will be smaller when people estimate the risk of a concrete, versus abstract, event.
We use the contexts of word compounds and words' level of abstractness only for validating our measure of semantic synergy.
Abstractness (A) represents the ratio of the number of abstract classes and interfaces to the total number of classes in the selected scope.
abstractness. A patentable invention may contain abstract ideas.
The abstractness and ambiguity of different norms and concepts enshrined in the provisions of the Rome Statute constitute a challenge to the whole legal process and lead to inconsistent decisions.
The five creative thinking abilities include: Fluency (the number of meaningful responses), Originality (the number of responses that are statistically infrequent); Elaboration (the ability to expand or embellish ideas, based on the number of additional details used in the development of the response beyond what was strictly necessary to express the basic idea); Abstractness of Titles (the ability to assign a title that synthesizes the drawing and that goes beyond specifically labeling it); and Resistance to Premature Closure (the ability to keep the mind open long enough to let original ideas arise) (Torrance et al., 1992).
It is possible to understand this marginalisation of historical scholarship as an implicit critique since the quality that I have just called 'abstractness' could, at least in many instances, also be expressed as the explicit focus on theory.
PAI also recommended caution in expanding the view of abstractness and obviousness in the awarding of patents.
Note that the word 'bullying' and all its variations have been placed in quotes over the course of this article--the purpose is to highlight the abstractness of the term and to provoke thought about its validity.
This model includes four linguistic categories along a dimension of abstractness to concreteness, with descriptive-action verbs being the most concrete and adjectives being the most abstract.
The authors readily acknowledge that these abstractions have their limits, but it's that very abstractness that makes them useful lodestars for navigating real-life conflicts, in which it's easy to get bogged down in the immediate circumstances and lose sight of larger trends that may be at work.
Some of the metric s for abstraction identified from the literature are the Measurement of Functional Abstraction (MFA) proposed by Bansiya and Davis [10] and the Abstractness (A) metrics defined in the Borland Together Tool [24].