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Related to abstractly: abstractedly, abstract thought

abstract

 [ab´strakt]
1. a short description of a scientific presentation or article.
2. a thought process that is oriented toward the development of an idea without application to, or association with, a particular instance. This type of thinking is independent of time and space.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt),
1. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. A condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

Abstract

Informatics A statement summarising the important points of a text; a brief summary or description of the essential content of an article, chapter or other complete work, often written by the author of the work.
Research
(1) A synopsis of research data that may be presented at scientific meetings and later published in a peer-reviewed journal; abstracts may not be subjected to the same rigorous review as the “lead” articles for the same journal; the purpose of the abstract is to enable the reader to efficiently grasp the essence of the report; the abstract can be very misleading; it is often the only part of the content of an article that will show up in a database.  
(2) A distillation of a presentation at a meeting, congress, conference, symposium, colloquium, seminar, workshop, round table, or other professional gathering.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. A condensation, summary, or brief description of a scientific or literary article or the results of a study.
2. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating it with milk sugar.
3. (ăb-strakt') To collect information from the medical record for research, billing, or statistical purposes.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. Preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. Condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
Because concrete construals are associated with feasibility information (Liberman & Trope, 1998), it was predicted that those induced to think concretely would see goal accomplishment and completing the course, as more likely than people primed to think abstractly. Because abstract construals are associated with task mastery and desirability (Freitas et al., 2001; Vallacher & Wegner, 1989), it was predicted that those induced to think abstractly would expect to perform better in the course and to enjoy the course more than those primed to think concretely.
It takes years to learn to think hypothetically and abstractly. This is one reason why younger children are impulsive and why they take what adults say so literally.
He painted abstractly throughout his career, but always with reference to the natural world.
But Forrester's genius is to make her grandeur personal, so it never becomes abstractly or generically Olympian but remains always connected to immediate feeling.
Epstein gives away the game when he concludes that the "comparative advantage of the academic perch is its ability to describe the global consequences that will follow from the rules of the game," forecasting that arises "largely [from] abstract knowledge of how incentives shape the conduct of individuals who are primarily but not exclusively interested in advancing their own self-interest." Financial incentives are not simply one element in explaining human behavior; They are practically the whole story, but one that can be told "abstractly."
Accumulating evidence suggests that an inability to think abstractly underlies verbal and numerical difficulties that arise in Williams syndrome, proposes psychologist Carolyn B.
They are able to think abstractly, but apply the information to real world problems.
"We are not abstractly dropping math into children's heads," says Lehrer.
Bank organizes her study into three somewhat abstractly conceived chapters.
Some of the information intended to answer those questions was presented abstractly such as "learn new behaviors and assume new responsibilities." Practical suggestions or examples on how to accomplish such tasks would have been helpful.
This communication opened their minds and gave them the ability to think abstractly and adopt a new view of self.
The sheer breadth of the contextualizations the volume assays largely precludes this, and indeed their sweep sometimes seems to leave the author's work to stand or fall on its abstractly "universal" merits, as tends to happen in the brief conclusion, "Toward A Theorem for Zapata," whose title rather overstates its case.