abstraction

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Related to abstractive: abstractedly, abstraction, abstracting

abstraction

 [ab-strak´shun]
1. the mental process of forming ideas that are theoretical or representational rather than concrete.
2. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
3. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is farther from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face.

ab·strac·tion

(ab-strak'shŭn),
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
See also: odontoptosis.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
See also: odontoptosis.
3. The making of an abstract from the crude drug.
See also: odontoptosis.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
See also: odontoptosis.
5. The processes or the results of discernment of formulation of general concepts from specific examples, and/or ascertainment of a given aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction

/ab·strac·tion/ (ab-strak´shun)
1. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
2. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is further from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face; cf. attraction (2).

abstraction

[abstrak′shən]
Etymology: L, abstrahere, to drag away
a condition in which teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures are inferior to their normal position, away from the occlusal plane. Also called infraclusion, or infraocclusion.

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
3. The making of an abstract from a crude drug.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
5. The process of selecting a certain aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction (abstrak´shən),

n teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures that are inferior to (below) their normal position; away from the occlusal plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
In terms of this second question, Stephen Dumont has shown perhaps more than anyone else the centrality of Scotus's distinction between abstractive and intuitive cognition in answering this quandary (58).
One could claim that the above abstractive progression is indeed at work in James, who first (already in the Principles) embraced a rather non technical (or gut) panpsychism--in 1909, he is still speaking of "mother-sea" or "common reservoir of consciousness" (11)--and later (in the Essays in Radical Empiricism) spelled the (dry) basics of a panexperientialist framework.
Through color linked to an abstractive project, Zola's develops a poetics where the wildness of the seascape is taken forward in a narrative that balances movement and counters destruction with the creation of sublime pools of color.
A static approach to strata sets aside not only questions of genetic origins, but also temporal ongoingness per se, and considers the structure of the experience in a "freeze-frame" mode, typically using a series of abstractive moves to disclose one-sided founding relations, in search of an ultimately self-sufficient level with respect to which the other levels are non-self-sufficient.
Extractive and abstractive methods are briefly compared; resulting summary evaluation problem is addressed.
In Buhler's functional view, the fusion of the three abstractive sign aspects would in his view make "homogeneous" signs (1990: 35) based on indexical signs, such as words or sentences to "steer a common action, or express a desire, warning, reaction, and so forth" (Innis 1992: 556).
This was evidence for a magical conception of objects rather than a rationalistic and abstractive use of numbers to refer to all objects.
My interpretation might be expressed in two propositions: 1) the intuitive and abstractive cognitions are different forms of a simple assent, and 2) within his own espistemological system, Ockham tries to avoid skeptical conclusions by way of reflexive cognitions.
As commonalities became apparent, more abstractive interpretation and coding occurred, and clear operational definitions were established for the emerging data categories, resulting in pattern codes.
par sa nature paradoxale et abstractive, les inquiete et les trouble.
Though anything will suffice for the abstractive visualization of being, being can become intensely associated with some things rather than with others, for example, with the mountains, or oceans, or sky, even the self.
In the event, his input to the exhibition comprises merely a few wall captions that are of no great perspicacity and a single room hung with some predictably chosen abstractive drawings.