abstraction


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abstraction

 [ab-strak´shun]
1. the mental process of forming ideas that are theoretical or representational rather than concrete.
2. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
3. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is farther from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face.

ab·strac·tion

(ab-strak'shŭn),
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
See also: odontoptosis.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
See also: odontoptosis.
3. The making of an abstract from the crude drug.
See also: odontoptosis.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
See also: odontoptosis.
5. The processes or the results of discernment of formulation of general concepts from specific examples, and/or ascertainment of a given aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction

/ab·strac·tion/ (ab-strak´shun)
1. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
2. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is further from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face; cf. attraction (2).

abstraction

[abstrak′shən]
Etymology: L, abstrahere, to drag away
a condition in which teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures are inferior to their normal position, away from the occlusal plane. Also called infraclusion, or infraocclusion.

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
3. The making of an abstract from a crude drug.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
5. The process of selecting a certain aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction (abstrak´shən),

n teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures that are inferior to (below) their normal position; away from the occlusal plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inspiring voyages tempered by introspection, Mischa brings new meaning to abstraction.
This paper is an effort to consider the geographies produced through abstraction and the development of a philosophy of praxis that might be adequate to critique and challenge that abstract reality.
Contemporary capitalism has evolved along two main vectors of abstraction: monetary abstraction (financialization) and technological abstraction (the algorithms of the metadata society).
The third part of the assessment involves quantification, prioritization as well as the identification the dominant groundwater abstraction sources that are impacting the groundwater body.
In behavioral terms, abstraction occurs when a stimulus feature or set of stimulus features become discriminative stimuli for behavior.
The subsequently adopted regulatory framework will, from 1 January 2008, impose a legally-binding reduction of 30% in nitrate inputs in the river basins of the nine water abstraction points in question.
Architect at the level of abstraction that provides the answers sought.
Mondrian's principles of rigorous abstraction, refined geometry, and exquisite nonsymmetrical balance have influenced modern architectural, industrial, and other nonfigurative design.
Mr Evans said the agency had to be seen to be treating all companies that exceeded their abstraction licence conditions the same and pointed out that a private company had recently been taken to court for similar breaches.
Loving the Lord and the neighbor is not an abstraction but an action, not about nouns but about verbs.
Metaphorical minstrelsy" disappeared in the 1940s, when modern dance choreographers embraced what Manning calls "mythic abstraction.