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abstract

 [ab´strakt]
1. a short description of a scientific presentation or article.
2. a thought process that is oriented toward the development of an idea without application to, or association with, a particular instance. This type of thinking is independent of time and space.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt),
1. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. A condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

Abstract

Informatics A statement summarising the important points of a text; a brief summary or description of the essential content of an article, chapter or other complete work, often written by the author of the work.
Research
(1) A synopsis of research data that may be presented at scientific meetings and later published in a peer-reviewed journal; abstracts may not be subjected to the same rigorous review as the “lead” articles for the same journal; the purpose of the abstract is to enable the reader to efficiently grasp the essence of the report; the abstract can be very misleading; it is often the only part of the content of an article that will show up in a database.  
(2) A distillation of a presentation at a meeting, congress, conference, symposium, colloquium, seminar, workshop, round table, or other professional gathering.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. A condensation, summary, or brief description of a scientific or literary article or the results of a study.
2. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating it with milk sugar.
3. (ăb-strakt') To collect information from the medical record for research, billing, or statistical purposes.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. Preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. Condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
The cost of abstracting can be looked at from several different perspectives.
Carried to its logical conclusion, of course, one could argue that the greatest cost associated with abstracting is the cost of the time spent by people in reading the abstracts (thus the importance of such factors as brevity and readability) and in taking actions based upon them (thus the importance of such factors as accuracy and exhaustivity).
Ultimately, they will judge abstracts and abstracting services in terms of costs and value to themselves.
Even in the presumably simpler case of linking abstracting and indexing databases to serials records in catalogs or union lists of serials, while many of the necessary linkage data elements (such as ISSNs) nominally exist in the relevant files, experience in practice has shown that the data are often inaccurate or incomplete; this problem will gradually fade as more use is made of such linking elements and errors are reported and corrected.
This has been a primarily technical analysis of the comparative benefits and drawbacks of distributed search and traditional centralized union catalogs, and of how some of these issues extend to the integration of abstracting and indexing databases and electronic primary content within the bibliographic apparatus that is needed to support resource sharing.