abstract

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abstract

 [ab´strakt]
1. a short description of a scientific presentation or article.
2. a thought process that is oriented toward the development of an idea without application to, or association with, a particular instance. This type of thinking is independent of time and space.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt),
1. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. A condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

Abstract

Informatics A statement summarising the important points of a text; a brief summary or description of the essential content of an article, chapter or other complete work, often written by the author of the work.
Research
(1) A synopsis of research data that may be presented at scientific meetings and later published in a peer-reviewed journal; abstracts may not be subjected to the same rigorous review as the “lead” articles for the same journal; the purpose of the abstract is to enable the reader to efficiently grasp the essence of the report; the abstract can be very misleading; it is often the only part of the content of an article that will show up in a database.  
(2) A distillation of a presentation at a meeting, congress, conference, symposium, colloquium, seminar, workshop, round table, or other professional gathering.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. A condensation, summary, or brief description of a scientific or literary article or the results of a study.
2. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating it with milk sugar.
3. (ăb-strakt') To collect information from the medical record for research, billing, or statistical purposes.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. Preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. Condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
The CLA says the current system does not help abstracters to trade water effectively, nor does it provide an incentive for abstracters to manage water efficiently.
It would also be interesting to know about the musical background of the abstracters. One can depend on the abstracts included in RILM, since the abstracts are written either by the author or by volunteer abstracters trained in musicology (frequently music librarians), but there is no mention as to who is abstracting for IIMP.
One reason the issue has not been sufficiently scrutinized is that most of the people involved in hypertext were not, at least until recently, librarians or related information professionals, such as indexers and abstracters.
This approach can result in "snowballing" data collection costs as abstracters go from office to office to find the required charts.
Introduction to Indexing and Abstracting concludes with a list of 99 Web resources for indexers and abstracters and a chapter titled "The Profession," which gives pointers for getting started as an indexer.