abstraction

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abstraction

 [ab-strak´shun]
1. the mental process of forming ideas that are theoretical or representational rather than concrete.
2. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
3. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is farther from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face.

ab·strac·tion

(ab-strak'shŭn),
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
See also: odontoptosis.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
See also: odontoptosis.
3. The making of an abstract from the crude drug.
See also: odontoptosis.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
See also: odontoptosis.
5. The processes or the results of discernment of formulation of general concepts from specific examples, and/or ascertainment of a given aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction

/ab·strac·tion/ (ab-strak´shun)
1. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
2. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is further from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face; cf. attraction (2).

abstraction

[abstrak′shən]
Etymology: L, abstrahere, to drag away
a condition in which teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures are inferior to their normal position, away from the occlusal plane. Also called infraclusion, or infraocclusion.

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
3. The making of an abstract from a crude drug.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
5. The process of selecting a certain aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction (abstrak´shən),

n teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures that are inferior to (below) their normal position; away from the occlusal plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
2a) There is cognitive phenomenology in pure abstract thought and this is evidence that it is also present in non-pure abstract thought.
The neural networks of such concepts will be charted, to investigate the link between abstract thought and sensory inputs.
Researchers have identified a family of stem cells that may give birth to neurons responsible for abstract thought and creativity.
The Daily Mail quoted Flynn as saying, "As the world gets more complex, and living in it demands more abstract thought, so people are adapting.
Contributors prove that abstract thought is available to children, that philosophy is a necessary part of moral education, that we need to get beyond the "deficit conception" of childhood, and that understanding of the tenets of both philosophy and religion key to understanding culture.
Hidden Smarts: Abstract thought trumps IQ scores in autism" (SN: 7/7/07, p.
BEES' brains give them the human power for abstract thought, scientists said yesterday.
The violences inflicted on the sentience of language by abstract thought, and on sincerity by rhetoric, can cause a poet physical pain.
Islamic law has an "impressive number of legal concepts," but these are derived "not from the concrete realities of legal life, but from abstract thought.
Neandertals apparently possessed a facility for abstract thought that has often been regarded as unique to modern Homo sapiens, says study director Jill Cook of the British Museum in London.
That brain region controls decision-making, social behaviour, and such uniquely human tendencies as creativity and abstract thought.
He cautions, however, that other symptoms of the disorder, such as extreme gregariousness toward strangers and difficulty understanding metaphors and other forms of abstract thought, may derive from much broader neural disruptions.