abstract


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to abstract: abstract noun, Abstract class

abstract

 [ab´strakt]
1. a short description of a scientific presentation or article.
2. a thought process that is oriented toward the development of an idea without application to, or association with, a particular instance. This type of thinking is independent of time and space.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt),
1. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. A condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstract

[ab′strakt, abstrakt′]
Etymology: L, abstrahere, to drag away
1 a condensed summary of a scientific article, literary piece, or address.
2 to collect data such as from a medical record.
3 a preparation containing the soluble principles of a medication concentration mixed with lactose.
4 difficult to understand because of lack of practicality.

Abstract

Informatics A statement summarising the important points of a text; a brief summary or description of the essential content of an article, chapter or other complete work, often written by the author of the work.
Research
(1) A synopsis of research data that may be presented at scientific meetings and later published in a peer-reviewed journal; abstracts may not be subjected to the same rigorous review as the “lead” articles for the same journal; the purpose of the abstract is to enable the reader to efficiently grasp the essence of the report; the abstract can be very misleading; it is often the only part of the content of an article that will show up in a database.  
(2) A distillation of a presentation at a meeting, congress, conference, symposium, colloquium, seminar, workshop, round table, or other professional gathering.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. A condensation, summary, or brief description of a scientific or literary article or the results of a study.
2. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating it with milk sugar.
3. (ăb-strakt') To collect information from the medical record for research, billing, or statistical purposes.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. Preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. Condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
Short (five-minute) video abstracts allow authors to present their research in person to the reader.
For clinical practice abstracts, the following sections are required: Purpose, Review of Literature, Summary (of the innovation or practice), and implications for Registered Nurses or Advanced Practice Registered Nurses.
Moreover, since philosophical and theological terms are limited in their semantic meanings, and given that visual nonrepresentational imagery appeals also to the mind's eye, there is a greater chance of establishing unity through abstract art.
Review your abstract and edit for spelling and grammar prior to submission.
Inattention to abstract development details, such as spelling and grammar, indicate to reviewers that the author or authors may not have given proper attention to all other important research project quality details.
The sorry state of abstracts was an impetus to the CONSORT group to publish, in 2008, a guideline for abstracts for randomized trials.
It is not until the full article is read that the utility of an abstract can be fully appreciated.
Absence of Reliability and Validity Data for Abstract Rating Process
A semi-structured abstract is written in only one paragraph, where each sentence corresponds to a section.
Many experts or teams with different specialties, interests, and perspectives could each recommend online articles, abstracts, reviews, organizations, events, or any other public Web pages of special importance for their audience.
Juli Milburn, a Lancaster High School art instructor known for abstract assemblages.