abstinence syndrome


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abstinence

 [ab´stĭ-nens]
a refraining from the use of or indulgence in food, stimulants, or coitus.
periodic abstinence natural family planning; see contraception.
abstinence syndrome withdrawal (def. 2).

ab·sti·nence syn·drome

a constellation of physiologic changes undergone by people or animals who have become physically dependent on a drug or chemical who are abruptly deprived of that substance. The intensity of the syndrome varies with the drug or chemical. Generally, the effects observed are in an opposite direction from those produced by the drug; for example, the withdrawal syndrome from CNS depressants (for example, barbiturates) consists of insomnia, restlessness, tremulousness, hallucinations, and, in the extreme, potentially fatal tonic-clonic convulsions. Onset time and severity of the syndrome depend on the rate at which the drug disappears from the body.

abstinence syndrome

Etymology: L, abstinere, to hold back; Gk, syn, together, dromos, course

ab·sti·nence syn·drome

(absti-nĕns sindrōm)
Constellation of physiologic changes undergone by people or animals who have become physically dependent on a drug or chemical and are abruptly deprived of that substance. The intensity of the syndrome varies with the drug or chemical.

ab·sti·nence syn·drome

(absti-nĕns sindrōm)
Constellation of physiologic changes undergone by people or animals who have become physically dependent on a drug or chemical who are abruptly deprived of that substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
NICU nurses' lived experience: Caring for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome.
In 2012, neonatal abstinence syndrome cost nearly $316 million in the United States.
Implementation of a neonatal abstinence syndrome weaning protocol: a multicenter cohort study.
Buprenorphine versus methadone in the treatment of pregnant opioid-dependent patients: effects on the neonatal abstinence syndrome.
Neonatal abstinence syndrome after in utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in term infants.
Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome is a growing nursing, medical, social and psychological issue.
By 2009, the estimated number of newborns with the syndrome was 13,539 -- or about one baby born each hour, according to the study that U-M researchers believe is the first to assess national trends in neonatal abstinence syndrome and mothers using opiate drugs.
In the students group of the Medical University, 5% of them (one woman and 4 men) had features suggestive of the Internet addiction, 2% of the respondents (2 men) had symptoms of the abstinence syndrome, 7% of the respondents (7 men) had symptoms "on-line" syndrome, and 9% of the students (one female and 8 male) were threatened with it.
The neonatal abstinence syndrome is a serious disorder in infants who are exposed to maternal drug abuse.
This presentation provides an overview of an evidence-based practice protocol for the treatment of neonates with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).
Another 23 infants under one had neonatal abstinence syndrome, a consequence of their mothers' drug abuse.
The risk of neonatal abstinence syndrome, which most commonly is delayed until the second or third day of life, is high in women using heroin or methadone (70 to 80%) and less but still a common problem in those on buprenorphine (53).