absorptive dressing

absorptive dressing

A dressing used to absorb draining serum, mucus, and sundry fluids from a wound.

Examples
Pads with non-adherent contact layers with highly absorbent layers of fibres—e.g., cellulose, cotton, or rayon—that gel when in contact with the draining liquid; adhesive border dressings with absorbent middle-contact layers; simple absorbent cover dressings.

Pros
Best for wounds with moderate to heavy exudate.

Cons
May saturate easily, setting up the wound for maceration and sloughing.

absorptive dressing

Wound care A dressing designed to absorb drainage from a wound
References in periodicals archive ?
Covaderm[R] (DeRoyal), Band-Aid Island Dressing[R] (Johnson & Johnson), Aquacel[R] Hydrofiber Dressing (ConvaTec), Tendersorb[R] WetPruf Abdominal Pad (Kendall), Exu-Dry[R] Wound Dressings and Garments (Smith & Nephew), Primapore[TM] Specialty Absorptive Dressing (Smith & Nephew), Curity[R] Abdominal Pads (Kendall).
Silicone dressings, specialty absorptive dressings, transparent films, and wound fillers will be discussed.
A controlled output from the sinus remained and was managed with simple absorptive dressings.
"Exudative wounds get absorptive dressings, dry wounds get moist dressings, wounds needing debridement sometimes get enzymatic or autolytic dressings," she added.
The categories to which a dressing may be assigned are: alginates, collagens, composites, contact layers, foams, gauze (impregnated and nonimpregnated), hydrocolloids, hydrogels (amorphous and sheet), silicone dressings, specialty absorptive dressings, transparent films, and wound fillers (Bryant, 1992).
Absorptive dressings can be classified as co-polymer starch dressings or calcium alginates.
These highly absorptive dressings interact with wound exudate forming a gel.