absorption coefficient


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coefficient

 [ko″ĕ-fish´ent]
1. an expression of the change or effect produced by the variation in certain variables, or of the ratio between two different quantities.
2. in chemistry, a number or figure put before a chemical formula to indicate how many times the formula is to be multiplied.
Bunsen coefficient the number of milliliters of gas dissolved in a milliliter of liquid at atmospheric pressure (760 mm Hg) and a specified temperature. Symbol, α.
confidence coefficient the probability that a confidence interval will contain the true value of the population parameter. For example, if the confidence coefficient is 0.95, 95 per cent of the confidence intervals so calculated for a large number of random samples would contain the parameter.
correlation coefficient a numerical value that indicates the degree and direction of relationship between two variables; the coefficients range in value from +1.00 (perfect positive relationship) to 0.00 (no relationship) to −1.00 (perfect negative or inverse relationship).
diffusion coefficient see diffusion coefficient.
coefficient of digestibility the proportion of a food that is digested compared to what is absorbed, expressed as a percentage.
dilution coefficient a number that expresses the effectiveness of a disinfectant for a given organism. It is calculated by the equation tcn = k, where t is the time required for killing all organisms, c is the concentration of disinfectant, n is the dilution coefficient, and k is a constant. A low coefficient indicates the disinfectant is effective at a low concentration.
linear absorption coefficient the fraction of a beam of radiation absorbed per unit thickness of absorber.
mass absorption coefficient the linear absorption coefficient divided by the density of the absorber.
phenol coefficient see phenol coefficient.
sedimentation coefficient the velocity at which a particle sediments in a centrifuge divided by the applied centrifugal field, the result having units of time (velocity divided by acceleration), usually expressed in Svedberg units (S), which equal 10−13 second. Sedimentation coefficients are used to characterize the size of macromolecules; they increase with increasing mass and density and are higher for globular than for fibrous particles.

ab·sorp·tion co·ef·fi·cient

1. the milliliters of a gas at standard temperature and pressure that will saturate 100 mL of liquid;
2. the amount of light absorbed in passing through 1 cm of a 1 molar solution of a given substance, expressed as a constant in Beer-Lambert law; Compare: specific absorption coefficient.
3. a measure of the rate of decrease of intensity of an x-ray beam in its passage through a substance, resulting from a combination of scattering and conversion to other forms of energy.

Absorption Coefficient

Chemistry The amount, in millilitres (mls), of a gas at a standard temperature and pressure that saturates 100 mls of a liquid.
Physics Wave absorption The amount of energy lost due to scattering—e.g., Compton effect—and conversion to other forms of energy as a wave travels a unit distance.

ab·sorp·tion co·ef·fi·cient

(ăb-sōrp'shŭn kō-ĕ-fish'ĕnt)
1. The milliliters of a gas at standard temperature and pressure that will saturate 100 mL of liquid.
2. The amount of light absorbed in passing through 1 cm of a 1 molar solution of a given substance, expressed as a constant in Beer-Lambert law.
3. radiology A measure of the rate of decrease of intensity of a beam in its passage through matter, resulting from a combination of scattering and conversion to other forms of energy.
See also: attenuation

ab·sorp·tion co·ef·fi·cient

(ab-sōrp'shŭn kō-ĕ-fish'ĕnt)
1. The milliliters of a gas at standard temperature and pressure that will saturate 100 mL of liquid.
2. The amount of light absorbed in passing through 1 cm of a 1 molar solution of a given substance, expressed as a constant in Beer-Lambert law.
3. radiology a measure of the rate of decrease of intensity of a beam in its passage through matter, resulting from a combination of scattering and conversion to other forms of energy.
See also: attenuation
References in periodicals archive ?
(a) Sound absorption coefficient and (b) sound TL of epoxy foams blown at different temperatures.
Figure 11 shows the relationship between capillary absorption coefficient and RCA replacement percentages with different loading levels, and the results manifest that the capillary absorption coefficient increases linearly with the rise of RCA replacement percentages with the same loading; however, the increased loading results in the increases in the slope of fitting line.
Increased resin lowers friction between the fibers, reducing heat losses and subsequently its sound absorption coefficient.
In summary, the sound absorption coefficient is associated with the tortuosity fractal dimension, the pore area fractal dimension, and the porosity.
In this circle, the absorption coefficient [[mu].sub.a] = 0.02 [mm.sup.-1] and [[mu].sub.s] = 20 [mm.sup.-1].
The layered tissue imagination consist of three layers having different optical properties representing, epidermis, dermis, and fatty tissue of human skin, the thickness, absorption coefficient ([[mu].sub.a]) of each layer for Nd-YGA laser at 1064nm have been depicted in table(2)[20].
The forward model of DOT is to find out the outgoing current on the detectors when the incident impulse and the absorption coefficients and scattering coefficients are known.
Absorption TRI appears as a correlation between the incident radiation and the absorption coefficient as, <G[[alpha].sub.total]> = <G> <[[alpha].sub.total]> + <G'[[alpha].sub.total']>.
Karimi, "Intersubband optical absorption coefficient changes and refractive index changes in a two-dimensional quantum pseudodot system," Superlattices Microstruct., Vol.
Key words: sound absorption coefficient, impedance tube, sound absorber
Specimens of various densities were made by composition B and 25-mm thickness, and the normal incidence absorption coefficient was measured.
According to Ramm methodology (Ramm, 1966) the effectiveness of the operation of the absorber and calculation of number stages is performed based on the absorption coefficient [phi] and the absorption factor A.