absorb

(redirected from absorbs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

absorb

 [ab-sorb´]
1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g., the skin or intestine.
2. to stop particles of radiation energy so that their energy is totally transferred to the absorbing material.
3. to retain specific wavelengths of radiation incident upon a substance, either raising its temperature or changing the energy state of its molecules.

ab·sorb

(ab-sōrb'), Do not confuse this word with adsorb.
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

absorb

/ab·sorb/ (-sorb´)
1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g., the skin or intestine.
2. to react with radiation energy so as to attenuate it.
3. to retain specific wavelengths of radiation incident upon a substance, either raising its temperature or changing the energy state of its molecules.

absorb

Absorb

Chemistry To take up a liquid or other substance by another. 
Physiology To assimilate, take in, as occurs in the GI tract, across the skin, and across the renal tubules.
Radiation physics To attenuate.

ab·sorb

(ăb-sōrb')
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

ab·sorb

(ăb-sōrb') Do not confuse this word with adsorb.
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

absorb (əbzôrb´),

v 1. to suck up or be removed.
v 2. to incorporate or assimilate a liquid or gas into tissue or cells.

absorb

1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g. the skin or intestine.
2. to stop particles of radiation so that their energy is totally transferred to the absorbing material.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neil Greenham of the University of Cambridge in England says that getting polymers to absorb infrared light is an important step but cautions that the material doesn't move electrons efficiently.
Wear lighter colors, lighter fabrics and natural fibers - such as cotton, linen and silk - which absorb moisture.
Phosphorescent atoms absorb and emit energy like fluorescent atoms.
Demonstrating improved sensitivity in recent experiments, the biochip could also identify specific molecules dissolved in water (which tends to absorb terahertz radiation strongly and obscure the signals from other molecules) for potential applications such as DNA identification in saliva.
The extra cobalt enables the material to absorb a larger part of the solar spectrum and thereby free up more electrons, explains Jaramillo.
Initial tests indicate that the product, which the scientists call SoyScreen, absorbs UV light best at wavelengths from 320 to 360 nanometers.
Plants only absorb the amount of nitrates they can use now.
CWT is also offering AbTech's series of Oil Smart Sponge skimmers, which absorb and encapsulate hydrocarbons and oil derivatives.
Vapor doesn't absorb enough radiation to explain the discrepancy fully, suggests a newly reported experiment from the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland.
today announced lithium silicate, a new ceramic material that surpasses other ceramics in the speed at which it absorbs carbon dioxide (CO2), and does so at room temperature.
That's because the atomic hydrogen, which readily absorbs photons, quenched the radiation.