absorb

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absorb

 [ab-sorb´]
1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g., the skin or intestine.
2. to stop particles of radiation energy so that their energy is totally transferred to the absorbing material.
3. to retain specific wavelengths of radiation incident upon a substance, either raising its temperature or changing the energy state of its molecules.

ab·sorb

(ab-sōrb'), Do not confuse this word with adsorb.
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

absorb

/ab·sorb/ (-sorb´)
1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g., the skin or intestine.
2. to react with radiation energy so as to attenuate it.
3. to retain specific wavelengths of radiation incident upon a substance, either raising its temperature or changing the energy state of its molecules.

absorb

Absorb

Chemistry To take up a liquid or other substance by another. 
Physiology To assimilate, take in, as occurs in the GI tract, across the skin, and across the renal tubules.
Radiation physics To attenuate.

ab·sorb

(ăb-sōrb')
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

ab·sorb

(ăb-sōrb') Do not confuse this word with adsorb.
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

absorb (əbzôrb´),

v 1. to suck up or be removed.
v 2. to incorporate or assimilate a liquid or gas into tissue or cells.

absorb

1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g. the skin or intestine.
2. to stop particles of radiation so that their energy is totally transferred to the absorbing material.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thompson II's book of the same name, absorbingly and intelligently explores the events leading up to the battleship's blast in Turret Two and the subsequent investigation that apparently whitewashed the truth and employed homophobia to tar the reputations of two sailors.
The reader is less to the fore in her discussion of Tournier, but figures spectrally in this absorbingly intricate account of doubling, the body and mutilation.
The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest (15) Fans of Larsson's book will be aghast at the changes made in the Swedish trilogy's finale as shady figures seek to prevent Lisbeth going to trial, but as a procedural/conspiracy thriller this is absorbingly gripping.
Genre specialist Jacques Audiard continues his fascination with the secret inner-lives of Gaul's criminal underworld in "A Prophet," a tough, absorbingly intricate account of a young French-Arab thug's improbable education behind bars.
One can only wish that its absorbingly fresh account of literature and the interpreting process--"here and now," as Wellbery puts it with infectious enthusiasm in his essay on Goethe's Faust--will reach the broadest possible audience.
Gunson, Dalton, a host of court reporters and legal experts, and Galley (now Samantha Geimer) absorbingly recount how concern for the girl--and reluctance to put her on the stand--led to a plea bargain.
Once it gets into its investigative stride, the complex pieces of the jigsaw start slotting into place and connections and explanations are revealed, it becomes absorbingly intelligent viewing.
Just as somber as "The Good Shepherd," the most recent domestic spy drama, but more lightly focused, "Breach" absorbingly zeroes in on how the FBI nailed the most damaging turncoat in American history.
Back on something like the penetrating form of early masterpieces Matewan and City of Hope, by working from a murder mystery template in similar fashion to Chinatown writer-director John Sayles unravels an absorbingly thoughtful and disturbingly plausible socio-political film noir.
Crammed with enough creepy contemporary vibes to keep conspiracy theorists occupied through the November election, Jonathan Demme's new take on "The Manchurian Candidate" absorbingly and sometimes mesmerizingly validates the initially questionable idea of remaking one of the certified classics of the '60s.
However, while absorbingly setting out a climate of political power games between the incumbent Roman authority and the Sanhedrin, it's here that the film has attracted the most criticism in regard to its alleged anti-Semitism.
Shattered Glass" credibly and absorbingly relates the tale of journalistic fraud perpetrated by young writer Stephen Glass at the New Republic five years back.