absorbable suture


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suture

 [soo´chur]
1. sutura.
2. a stitch or series of stitches made to secure apposition of the edges of a surgical or traumatic wound; used also as a verb to indicate application of such stitches.
3. material used in closing a wound with stitches. adj., adj su´tural.
Various types of sutures. From Dorland's, 2000.
absorbable suture a strand of material that is used for closing wounds and becomes dissolved in the body fluids and disappears; types include surgical gut, tendon, and some synthetics.
apposition suture a superficial suture used for exact approximation of the cutaneous edges of a wound.
approximation suture a deep suture for securing apposition of the deep tissue of a wound.
buried suture one placed within the tissues and concealed by the skin.
catgut suture an absorbable suture made from surgical gut.
cobbler's suture double-armed suture.
collagen suture a suture made from the tendons of cattle, chemically treated, purified, and processed into strands; it is most often used in ophthalmologic surgery.
continuous suture one in which a continuous, uninterrupted length of material is used.
coronal suture the line of union between the frontal bone and the parietal bones.
cranial suture the lines of junction between the bones of the skull.
Czerny's suture
1. an intestinal suture in which the thread is passed through the mucous membrane only.
2. union of a ruptured tendon by splitting one of the ends and suturing the other end into the slit.
Czerny-Lembert suture a combination of the Czerny and the Lembert sutures.
double-armed suture one made with suture material threaded through a needle at each end. Called also cobbler's suture.
false suture a line of junction between apposed surfaces without fibrous union of the bones.
Gély's suture a continuous stitch for wounds of the intestine, made with a thread having a needle at each end.
interrupted suture one in which each stitch is made with a separate piece of material.
lambdoid suture the line of union between the upper borders of the occipital and parietal bones, shaped like the Greek letter lambda.
Lembert suture an inverting suture used in gastrointestinal surgery.
lock-stitch suture a continuous hemostatic suture used in intestinal surgery, in which the needle is, after each stitch, passed through the loop of the preceding stitch.
mattress suture suturing with the stitches parallel to the wound edges (horizontal mattress suture) or at right angles to them (vertical mattress suture).
purse-string suture a type of suture commonly used to bury the stump of the appendix, a continuous running suture being placed about the opening, and then drawn tight.
relaxation suture any suture so formed that it may be loosened to relieve tension as necessary.
retention suture a reinforcing suture made of exceptionally strong material such as wire, and including large amounts of tissue in each stitch. Used to relieve pressure on the primary suture line and to decrease the potential for wound dehiscence.
sagittal suture the line of union of the two parietal bones, dividing the skull anteroposteriorly into two symmetrical halves.
squamous suture the suture between the pars squamosa of the temporal bone and parietal bone.
subcuticular suture a method of skin closure involving placement of stitches in the subcuticular tissues parallel with the line of the wound.
synthetic absorbable suture an absorbable suture produced from strands of polymers; the most commonly used materials are polyglactin 910 (Vicryl) and polyglycolic acid (Dexon); the latter is more rapidly absorbed. Synthetic absorbable sutures are absorbed by slow hydrolysis, a chemical process in which the polymer reacts with tissue fluids, causing a breakdown of the molecular structure of the material at a predictable rate and with minimal tissue reaction.
vertical mattress suture a suture whose stitches are at right angles to the edges of the wound, taking both deep and superficial bites of tissue; the superficial ones achieve more exact apposition of the cutaneous margins. When the suture material is pulled tight, the wound edges evert.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

absorbable suture

(əb-zôr′bə-bəl)
n.
A suture used in surgery composed of a material that can be digested by body tissues.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Absorbable Suture

Any suture material—catgut and biosynthetics, including polyglycolic acid, polylactic acid, polydioxanone, and caprolactone—which is left in place and removed by natural processes—e.g., hydrolysis and/or proteolytic degradation over a period of 2 to 8 weeks.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

absorbable suture

see Catgut, Suture, Synthetic absorbable suture.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ab·sorb·a·ble su·ture

(ăb-sōr'bă-bĕl sū'chŭr)
Suture material dissolved by the body's enzymes during the healing process; used when deep tissue requires inner layers of suture to close a wound.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ab·sorb·a·ble su·ture

(ăb-sōr'bă-bĕl sū'chŭr)
Suture material dissolved by the body's enzymes during the healing process; used when deep tissue requires inner layers of suture to close a wound.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The cosmetic outcome results of our study were also consistent with previously published reports evaluating the use of absorbable sutures in laceration repair.
Absorbable versus non- absorbable suture in carpal tunnel decompression.
The absorbable sutures market segment is further segmented into natural and synthetic absorbable sutures.
The tissue reinforcement material is preloaded and secured with Biosyn[TM] synthetic absorbable sutures to improve OR efficiency and reduce the risks of handling errors.
Conventional technologies for surgically closing skin consist of using absorbable sutures and metal staples.
The new Danfoss AutomationDrive FC302 induction motor is to be used on two machines manufactured by FIBER TRUSI N TECHNOLOGY LTD for the production of medical synthetic PGA absorbable sutures in Korea and Japan.
The mylohyoid is sutured to the digastric fascia with absorbable sutures. The submandibular capsule is sutured to the cervical fascia below the digastric muscle, and the cut ends of the platysma muscle are repaired.
In a prospective study, 68 patients with third-degree hemorrhoids underwent the procedure at these two centers; absorbable sutures were used in all cases.
Absorbable sutures need not be removed and therefore, save time and also reduce patient anxiety postoperatively.
* Preloaded tissue reinforcement material secured with Biosyn[TM] synthetic absorbable sutures to improve OR efficiency and reduce the risks of handling errors.
We repaired the injured mucosa and the orifices of the fistulae with absorbable sutures and cauterized the area.
Use of absorbable sutures "is likely to obviate a return visit to the physician for suture removal, which has both practical and fiscal implications," they said.