absolute zero


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zero

 [ze´ro]
1. the absence of all quantity or magnitude; naught.
2. the point on a thermometer scale at which the graduations begin. The zero of the Celsius (centigrade) scale is the ice point; on the Fahrenheit scale it is 32 degrees below the ice point.
absolute zero the lowest possible temperature, designated 0 on the Kelvin or Rankine scale; the equivalent of −273.15°C or −459.67°F.

ab·so·lute ze·ro

the lowest possible temperature, that at which the form of translational molecular motion constituting heat is assumed no longer to exist, determined as -273.15°C or 0 kelvin.

absolute zero

the temperature at which all molecular activity except vibration ceases. It is a theoretical value derived by calculations and projections from experiments with the behavior of gases at extremely low temperatures. Absolute zero is estimated to be equal to -273° C or -460° F.

Absolute Zero

The lowest possible temperature—0º Kelvin, -273.15º Celsius, -459.67º F. At absolute zero, all molecular motion stops.

ab·so·lute ze·ro

(ab'sŏ-lūt' zēr'ō)
The lowest possible temperature; the temperature at which the form of translational motion constituting heat is assumed no longer to exist, determined as -273.15°C or 0° Kelvin.

absolute zero

the lowest possible temperature for all substances, at which their molecules possess no heat energy. -273.15 °C is usually accepted as absolute zero.

zero

the point on a thermometer scale from which the graduations begin. The zero of the Celsius (centigrade) scale is the ice point; on the Fahrenheit scale it is 32° below the ice point.

absolute zero
the lowest possible temperature, designated 0 on the Kelvin or Rankine scale, the equivalent of −273.15° C or −459.67° F.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in a vacuum - if densities are low enough to avoid condensation and if temperatures can be lowered to near absolute zero - free atoms can be slowed down to speeds of less than one mile per hour, allowing a close examination of their nature and properties.
In 1906, however, the German physical chemist Walther Hermann Nernst (1864-1941) advanced thermodynamic reasons for supposing that absolute zero could not be reached by any technique.
It is an honor to receive Delphi's Absolute Zero Defect Award," said Dan Artusi, president and chief operating officer of Silicon Laboratories.
I think I have seen absolute zero evidence that this will happen.
They supercooled atoms of the element rubidium to the coldest temperature ever--nearly -273 [degrees] C (-460 [degrees] F), also known as absolute zero (see "thermometer," left).
It turned out that helium liquefied at a temperature of only 4 degrees above absolute zero.
Nasdaq:CRUS) has received the Delphi Delco Electronic Systems Absolute Zero Defect Award, given annually to suppliers that demonstrate the highest ability to provide products with no defects and that conform to Delphi's stringent specifications for quality and performance.
The third law of thermodynamics prohibits scientists from reaching absolute zero, but that doesn't stop the competitive among them from trying to get as close as possible.
In order to measure the miniscule amount of heat produced, the detector must be cooled to temperatures close to absolute zero, and a cryogenic facility, reinforced with lead and polyethylene bricks and protected from cosmic radiation as it housed under the Tobazo mountain, has been installed at the Canfranc underground laboratory.
At absolute zero everything stops but there is still a flow of time.
That is because an atom laser can exist only in an extremely low vacuum at temperatures close to absolute zero, where atoms slow down and assume the form of an entirely new category of matter.
Kamerlingh Onnes, having liquefied helium and obtained temperatures of 4 degrees above absolute zero (4[degrees]K) and even lower (see 1908), was eager to study the properties of matter at such exceedingly low temperatures.