abscopal effect

ab·sco·pal ef·fect

a reaction produced following irradiation but occurring outside the zone of actual radiation absorption.

ab·sco·pal ef·fect

(ab-skō'păl e-fekt')
A reaction produced following irradiation but occurring outside the zone of actual radiation absorption.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Journal of Medical Virology published a Targovax paper named 'Abscopal effect when combining oncolytic adenovirus and checkpoint inhibitor in a humanized NOG mouse model of melanoma'
According to the statement, it appears that therapeutic success in patients would require achieving an abscopal effect, where following focused radiation therapy, non-targeted tumour cells are attacked by the immune system.
Analysis of spider plots show tumor shrinkage in both injected and uninjected lesions, indicating an abscopal effect. Responding subjects include one patient with mucosal melanoma and one patient with acral melanoma, two forms of melanoma that are particularly difficult to treat.
A phenomenon known as the abscopal effect has been described in some patients with metastatic disease who received treatment with radiation therapy to one or more metastatic lesions and had nonirradiated tumors shrinking outside the radiation field.
The abscopal effect, a phenomenon that corresponds to the regression of distant metastases during primary treatment, is another explanation for a potential benefit of local treatment.
The role of these inflammatory molecules in the response of tissues to irradiation has also been related to the abscopal effect through adaptive immune responses [7].
In addition to the chemotherapy treatment, the tumors outside the radiation field also decreased in size which could be either the effect of chemotherapy or the abscopal effect of radiation [18].
Since the released IDO inhibitor could modulate the suppressive tumor microenvironment of both the treated and untreated tumors, the abscopal effect was evaluated in colorectal cancer mouse models.
The trial aims to evaluate the ability of NBTXR3 to generate an abscopal effect.
Knowledge of this abscopal effect goes back for over half a century; radiation oncologists have been well aware that localized radiotherapy can on rare occasion trigger "out-of-target tumor responses" so that tumors elsewhere in the body, areas that were not treated with radiation, shrink.
These two cases illustrate the abscopal effect first described in 1953 by Dr.