abscission

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ab·scis·sion

(ab-si'shŭn), Avoid the mispronunciation ab-si'zhŭn.
Cutting away.
[L. ab-scindo, pp. -scissus, to cut away from]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

abscission

(ăb-sĭzh′ən)
n.
The act of cutting off.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

abscission

An antiquated term for cutting; in modern medicine it has been replaced by the term excision, see there.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ab·scis·sion

(ab-sish'ŭn)
Cutting away.
[L. ab-scindo, pp. -scissus, to cut away from]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

abscission

The act of cutting off.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
Abscissionclick for a larger image
Fig. 4 Abscission . Abscission layer in a leafstalk.

abscission

the process by which plant organs are shed. This process occurs in the stalks of unfertilized flowers, in ripe fruits and in the base of the petiole of deciduous leaves in autumn, or in diseased leaves at any time. It is due to the formation of an abscission layer of thin-walled cells in the stalk base which rupture under strain produced by e.g. wind. A layer of cork forms beneath the abscission layer to seal the plant surface. Abscission is controlled by plant hormones present: a low concentration of AUXIN, high amounts of ETHYLENE, and (in some plants) a high concentration of ABSCISIC ACID all stimulate production of the abscission layer.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

ab·scis·sion

(ab-sĭ'zhŭn)
Cutting away.
[L. ab-scindo, pp. -scissus, to cut away from]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, fruit abscission percentage remained low during shelf life observations of all treatments (Figure 1C and Figure 1D), this research confirmed the low fruit abscission on 'Calypso' and higher rates of fruit abscission on 'MG 302' previously identified by SEGATTO et al.
Caption: Figure 1--Accumulated abscission in leaves (A, B) and fruits (C, D) of the ornamental pepper cultivars 'Calypso' and 'MG 302', after being treated with ethylene 48 hours, 1-MCP, 1-MCP + ethylene for 48 hours, STS and STS + ethylene for 48 hours and control.
The 1-MCP treated plants had the lowest rate of leaf abscission during post production shelf life, and after 18 days, only 22% of leaves had dropped, while control plants showed up to 50% of abscission (Figure 1).
However, 1-MCP did not prevent petal abscission of new open flowers.
The total abscission of 29.1- 50.8% obtained in this study is less than that reported for cowpea and soybean, in which the abscission levels were up to 70% or more [11].
This pattern of abscission may be due to the amount of light available at each canopy region since irradiance is said to decrease with depth into the canopy [15].