abreaction

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abreaction

 [ab″re-ak´shun]
the expression of emotions associated with repressed material, usually of an anxiety-provoking or conflictual nature, which is brought into a person's awareness and relived. See also catharsis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ab·re·ac·tion

(ab-rē-ak'shŭn),
In freudian psychoanalysis, an episode of emotional release or catharsis associated with the conscious recollection of repressed unpleasant experiences.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

abreaction

Emotional release or discharge associated with recall and resolution of mental trauma experienced and repressed in childhood. A therapeutic effect may occur through partial discharge or desensitisation of the painful emotions and increased insight.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

abreaction

Psychiatry Emotional release or discharge associated with remembering and resolving repressed mental trauma experienced and repressed in childhood. See False memory.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ab·re·ac·tion

(ab-rē-ak'shŭn)
freudian psychoanalysis An emotional release or catharsis associated with the recollection of previously repressed unpleasant experiences.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

abreaction

A process used in PSYCHOTHERAPY in which repressed thoughts and feelings are brought into consciousness and ‘relived’. Abreaction is, it is hoped, followed by CATHARSIS and is most readily achieved when the trouble arises from a recent traumatic event.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Following a thorough assessment, a number of hypnotherapeutic techniques are explained and discussed, such as: general relaxation and calmness, guided imagery, teaching self-hypnosis, ego-strengthening, direct and indirect suggestions for healing and recovery, cognitive restructuring and reframing, symbolic guided imagery, age progression (back from the future technique), metaphorical prescriptions, age regression and abreactions, and ego state therapy.
It is, however, much more difficult to readily impart skills for how to facilitate intense abreactions and to then cognitively reframe and work through trauma in such a manner that it provides a corrective emotional experience (Hammond, 1990, p.
She offers hypnotic techniques and methods that tap into their imaginations to heal abreactions to negative situations or habits.