ablatio


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ablatio

 [ab-la´she-o] (L.)
ablatio re´tinae retinal detachment.

ablatio

Latin for ablation, see there.

ablatio

An obsolescent term meaning separation.
References in periodicals archive ?
(23) John Money, Ablatio Penis: Normal Male Infant Sex-Reassigned as a Girl, ARCHIVES OF SEXUAL BEHAVIOR, Vol 4.1 65, at 66 (1975) [hereinafter Money, Ablatio Penis]; see also Chase, Hermaphrodites with Attitude, supra note 19, at 192 (noting "Members of the Johns Hopkins intersex team have justified female assignment by saying, 'You can make a hole, but you can't build a pole'") (citing Melissa Hendricks, Is It a Boy or a Girl?, JOHNS HOPKINS MAG., Nov.
See Money, Ablatio Penis, supra note 23, at 66-71 (discussing case study).
Experiment of nurture: Ablatio penis at 2 months, sex reassignment at 7 months, and a psychosexual follow-up in young adulthood.
Clearly a major factor producing change was the revelation of John/Joan (David Reimer), following Milton Diamond's and Keith Sigmundson's article reporting on David's (John/Joan's) rejection of his female identity, and questioning the recommendation that those individuals presenting XY ablatio penis be raised as a girl.
Bradley et al., Experiment of Nurture: Ablatio Penis at 2 Months, Sex Reassignment at 7 Months, and a Psychosexual Follow-up in Young Adulthood, 102 PEDIATRICS 9 (1998) (reporting on a case similar to David Reimer, a 46-chromosome XY male who sustained a burn of the skin of the penis during a circumcision and was assigned the female sex), available at http://www.pediatrics .org/cgi/content/full/102/1/e9.
(52) The reversal of the Dionysian sequence (remotio, ablatio, causa) in his early commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard is indicative of Aquinas's preferred metaphysical and linguistic method of progressing from causal affirmation, through the refinement of negation to the affirmation of God's preeminent transcendence: "Dicit enim quod ex creaturis tribus modis devenimus in Deum: scilicet per causalitatem, per remotionem, per eminentiam." (53) Aquinas's variations upon the sequence of stages are occasioned by the context of his argument, yet common to all is the underlying affirmation of causality and the imperfect (yet genuine) similitude between creatures and God.