aberrant

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ab·er·rant

(ab'er-ant),
1. Differing from the usual or norm; in botany or zoology, used for certain atypical individuals in a species; abnormal.
2. Wandering off; used to describe certain ducts, vessels, or nerves that deviate from the usual or normal course or pattern.
3. Synonym(s): deviant (1)
[L. aberrans]

aberrant

adjective Abnormal, deviant.

ab·er·rant

(ab-er'ănt)
1. Wandering off; said of certain ducts, vessels, or nerves deviating from the normal course or pattern.
2. Differing from the normal; in botany or zoology, said of certain atypical individuals in a species.
3. Synonym(s): ectopic (1) .
[L. aberrans]

aberrant

Deviating from the normal. The term may be applied to variations in the fine detail of body structure, such as the size and position of small arteries, or to modes of behaviour not generally considered acceptable. See also ABNORMAL.

ab·er·rant

(ab-er'ănt)
1. Differing from the usual or norm; in botany or zoology, used for certain atypical individuals in a species; abnormal.
2. Wandering off; used to describe certain ducts, vessels, or nerves that deviate from the usual or normal course or pattern.
[L. aberrans]
References in periodicals archive ?
The QRS during these forms of SVT should be the same as during sinus rhythm, unless there is aberrancy. An atrial electrogram during AV reciprocating tachycardia and AVN re-entrant tachycardia demonstrates a regular relationship of the atrial impulse with the QRS and a short RP interval.
However, ob-gyns may recommend a pelvic exam if the teen has had an abnormal puberty (pubertal aberrancy), abnormal bleeding, or abdominal or pelvic pain.
Each provides a well-balanced overview of aberrancy in affective states.
In "Modernist Freaks and Postmodernist Geeks" David Mitchell examines the literary grotesque as "an artistic fantasy that invokes physical aberrancy as a visible symptom of social disorganization and collapse," and which also "turns disability into a shorthand method of characterization that simplistically reveals the intangible secrets of a psyche in conflict" (348).
Thus the labyrinth allusion also helps to highlight a fundamental aberrancy in the mating choices characterizing this privileged, post-war world.
The underlying imperative, of course, is that we should get back to business as usual as efficiently as possible, that students should be medicated or otherwise therapized to stifle their distress, that the "cry for help" that might be inconsistent with a student's past behavior is an aberrancy to be corrected, rather than a necessary response to an horrific situation, a response that should be acted upon rather than stifled.
In this scene in the prison, Dinah acts as the analyst, probing, questioning, and, as Brooks puts it, "recomposing" the narrative of crime and its consequences: "The narrative chain, with each event connected to the next by reasoned causal links, marks the victory of reason over chaos, of society over the aberrancy of crime" (Psychoanalysis 49).
Though his immediate intellectual motivation is warranted (as a heartfelt reaction against the irrational aberrancy of the literal-fundamentalist science of Zia ul Haq's Pakistan), his solution in the notion of modern science as value-neutral is not, but is, indeed, an extreme inversion of the short-sighted fundamentalism he so abhors.
There is no better way to escape the fear of strangeness than by forgetting aberrancy through its dissolution into the social norm ...
First published in 1986 as El hombre sentimental, The Man of Feeling is a brief, intense portrait of an aberrant artist, an artist of aberrancy. Its narrator, Leon de Napoles, is a promising opera star who declares, "I need to try to destroy myself or to destroy someone else," and accomplishes both objectives.
But Amiana struggles to cast sensual appetite as part of a circumambient, but discreet, aberrancy. Her "failure" allows for the creation of a textured and sometimes prurient narrative.