aberrant

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ab·er·rant

(ab'er-ant),
1. Differing from the usual or norm; in botany or zoology, used for certain atypical individuals in a species; abnormal.
2. Wandering off; used to describe certain ducts, vessels, or nerves that deviate from the usual or normal course or pattern.
3. Synonym(s): deviant (1)
[L. aberrans]

aberrant

/ab·er·rant/ (ah-ber´ant) (ab´ur-ant) wandering or deviating from the usual or normal course.

aberrant

aberrant

adjective Abnormal, deviant.

ab·er·rant

(ab-er'ănt)
1. Wandering off; said of certain ducts, vessels, or nerves deviating from the normal course or pattern.
2. Differing from the normal; in botany or zoology, said of certain atypical individuals in a species.
3. Synonym(s): ectopic (1) .
[L. aberrans]

aberrant

Deviating from the normal. The term may be applied to variations in the fine detail of body structure, such as the size and position of small arteries, or to modes of behaviour not generally considered acceptable. See also ABNORMAL.

ab·er·rant

(ab-er'ănt)
1. Differing from the usual or norm; in botany or zoology, used for certain atypical individuals in a species; abnormal.
2. Wandering off; used to describe certain ducts, vessels, or nerves that deviate from the usual or normal course or pattern.
[L. aberrans]

aberrant (aber´ənt),

adj deviating from the usual or normal course, location, or action.
References in periodicals archive ?
The table demonstrates the highly nuanced understanding of the "risks" associated with physical aberrance that fraternal insurers had employed by the end of the 19th century through the application of medical science and social attitudes.
Decades of criminological research have shown the extreme aberrance of violent criminals in comparison with ordinary people.
these facts accord with the earlier point regarding the aberrance of
Identity politics is the cynical notion that homosexuality is so aberrant that the only reasonable response to it is to change homosexuals into heterosexuals, and failing that, to punish them for their aberrance by withholding civil rights.
Ideas of aberrance have been common to most ways of thinking about drought throughout the modern period of Western culture--and they form the forefront of my research.
Given Surridge's final turn to the dismissal of domestic violence as aberrance, it is puzzling that she does not take up the question of aberrance in the other narratives she studies.
Health is an illusive ideal we strive toward in keeping entropy at bay; it is the largely unanalyzed ground of illness and, in the passage above, of aberrance.
Topics range from the latest trends in educational theory and practice ("It is tricky" is one conclusion) to common but still inexplicable student and parental behaviors (apparently it is not cheating if one pays for one's term papers with one's own allowance), administrational aberrance ranging from the bizarre to the even more bizarre, and always-piquant observations from the sidelines.
When critics do acknowledge her high standing, they tend to refer to her as an "Amazon," reinforcing the aberrance of female authority and further promoting colonial myths about African women.
While New Zealand concepts of national identity diverge significantly from the American self envisaged by Emerson and Thoreau, a similar ambivalence characterizes the use of disability in representing New Zealand identity as simultaneously a crippling conformity and a distinctive and valuable aberrance.
poems both Ginsberg and Sexton assert that it is their very aberrance,