aberrant

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ab·er·rant

(ab'er-ant),
1. Differing from the usual or norm; in botany or zoology, used for certain atypical individuals in a species; abnormal.
2. Wandering off; used to describe certain ducts, vessels, or nerves that deviate from the usual or normal course or pattern.
3. Synonym(s): deviant (1)
[L. aberrans]

aberrant

adjective Abnormal, deviant.

ab·er·rant

(ab-er'ănt)
1. Wandering off; said of certain ducts, vessels, or nerves deviating from the normal course or pattern.
2. Differing from the normal; in botany or zoology, said of certain atypical individuals in a species.
3. Synonym(s): ectopic (1) .
[L. aberrans]

aberrant

Deviating from the normal. The term may be applied to variations in the fine detail of body structure, such as the size and position of small arteries, or to modes of behaviour not generally considered acceptable. See also ABNORMAL.

ab·er·rant

(ab-er'ănt)
1. Differing from the usual or norm; in botany or zoology, used for certain atypical individuals in a species; abnormal.
2. Wandering off; used to describe certain ducts, vessels, or nerves that deviate from the usual or normal course or pattern.
[L. aberrans]
References in periodicals archive ?
We focus here on the mutual constitution of ideas of race and abnormality, ecological knowledge, and the biophysical world to argue that conservation science, as it developed in the 20th century, is fundamentally rooted in these racialized notions of evolutionary fitness that separate biological advantage from aberrance. Clearly conservation is biopolitical in that it shifts from controlling individuals to statistically managing populations and species.
Based on previous problem statements, this study, thus, aims at examining the quality of a teacher-made test on fractions and decimals and diagnosing students' related misconceptions through a classroom-based cognitive diagnostic model of the BW aberrance indices family.
Each week, the England and Wales detection system flags [approximately equal to]20 organisms, listed in decreasing order of aberrance, for further investigation.
While her aberrance draws the most attention, it is her conventionalism that is ultimately most telling.
Testing the validity of the cultural competence data collection instrument by conducting ancillary analyses of the existing data set including tests for random responding, degrees of aberrance, and overall integrity of the data.
In this sense, they are deterritorializations in Deleuzian terms--excursions into unexplored territory through the rejection of the a priori--whose aberrance and unfamiliarity call for contemplation and thought.
During data analyses, aberrance appeared which could indicate possible group collaboration during exams.
(99) As a mass movement with tens of thousands of members, this rejection rate still meant that thousands of people were prevented from subscribing to fraternal insurance as a result of their physical aberrance. These estimates of course do not account for the number of people discouraged from even applying because of their physical difference or age.
Bush goes on to normativize (implying the aberrance of competing beliefs) democratic values: "the values of freedom are right and true for every person, in every society--and the duty of protecting these values against their enemies is the common calling of freedom-loving people across the globe and across the ages.
In this regard, art history has inadvertently given us the means of attributing aberrance to the art of our age, since the current pluralism contradicts the historical model of a succession of discrete period or cultural styles as blatantly as the aperiodicity of chaos contradicts the regularity of the clockwork universe.
To interpret McCullers's sexual identity--and stasis--forty years after her death, we must consider not only her articulated self-descriptions and desires but also contemporaneous conceptions of homosexuality and the social conditions that enabled and produced the inability to name oneself or articulate one's desires; the fear and reality of persecution for aberrance; and internalized homophobia, self-loathing, and shame.