abduction

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abduction

 [ab-duk´shun]
the act of abducting; the state of being abducted.

ab·duc·tion

(ab-dŭk'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with adduction. In lecturing and dictation some physicians pronounce the word "A B duction" to avoid ambiguity.
1. Movement of a body part away from the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the temple.
3. A position resulting from such movement. Compare: adduction.
Synonym(s): abductio [TA]
[L. abductio]

abduction

/ab·duc·tion/ (ab-duk´shun) the act of abducting; the state of being abducted.
Enlarge picture
Abduction of the fingers.

abduction

Etymology: L, abducere, to take away
movement of a limb away from the midline or axis of the body. abduct, v. Compare adduction.

Abduction

Movement of an extremity on a transverse plane away from the axis or midline, where the axis lies on the frontal and sagittal planes.

abduction

Neurology Movement of an extremity on a transverse plane away from the axis or midline. Cf Adduction.

ab·duc·tion

(ab-dŭk'shŭn)
1. Movement of a body part away from the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the temple.
3. A position resulting from such movement.
Compare: adduction
[L. abductio]

abduction

A movement outwards from the mid-line of the body or from the central axis of a limb. The opposite, inward, movement is called ADDUCTION.
Figure 1: The sites of the main nerve centres and descending pathways in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary movement, represented in diagrammatic sections.

abduction

movement sideways of the arm at the shoulder, of the leg at the hip, of a finger, thumb or toe away from the middle of the hand or foot; abductor a muscle with this action; opposite of adduction. Figure 1.

abduct

; abduction movement away from the median line or sagittal plane

abduction (ab·dukˑ·shn),

n joint movement away from the body along the horizontal plane.
Enlarge picture
Abduction.

abduction 

Outward rotation of an eye, that is away from the midline. See duction; Duane's syndrome.

ab·duc·tion

(ab-dŭk'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with adduction.
1. Movement of a body part away from the median plane.
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the temple.
3. A position resulting from such movement.
[L. abductio]

abduction (abduk´shən),

n the process of abducting; opposite of adduction.

abduction

the act of abducting; the state of being abducted. For a digit, the drawing away from the axis of the limb.
References in periodicals archive ?
yesterday introduced a bipartisan resolution designating April as International Parental Child Abduction Month.
Supt Bacon added: "A proportion of these cases involve parental abductions and other cases where the victims and offenders are known to each other, rather than youngsters being 'snatched' off the streets by strangers.
The charity has received a grant from the People's Postcode Lottery to help launch the UK Child Abduction Hub.
An Abduction Revelation" is published by Balboa Press and is available online at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.
It's natural to conduct a thorough investigation if there's even the slightest possibility" of a connection to North Korea's abductions, Ota said at a news conference.
I am determined to achieve the return of all abductees, hunt for the truth of the abductions and secure the handover of abductors under my Cabinet," the prime minister said.
Senate for adopting Resolution 543 on International Parental Child Abduction, and shame on the two senators from Oregon for co-sponsoring it.
It is clear that the abduction issue is part of our concerns.
A neighborhood canvass may cover the area around the victim's residence or last known location--the most recent place the victim was sighted after the initial abduction.
Statistics collected by Reunite suggest that 70 percent of abductions are undertaken by mothers.
Jacobs specializes in the issue of child abduction - an issue of inter-country marriages in which one parent takes a child to their home country and abandons the other parent.
Masami Ito, Outside the 1980 Hague Convention: Japan Remains Safe Haven for Parental Abductions, JAPAN TIMES, Dec.