abduction

(redirected from abductio)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to abductio: Alien abduction

abduction

 [ab-duk´shun]
the act of abducting; the state of being abducted.

ab·duc·tion

(ab-dŭk'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with adduction. In lecturing and dictation some physicians pronounce the word "A B duction" to avoid ambiguity.
1. Movement of a body part away from the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the temple.
3. A position resulting from such movement. Compare: adduction.
Synonym(s): abductio [TA]
[L. abductio]

abduction

/ab·duc·tion/ (ab-duk´shun) the act of abducting; the state of being abducted.
Enlarge picture
Abduction of the fingers.

abduction

Etymology: L, abducere, to take away
movement of a limb away from the midline or axis of the body. abduct, v. Compare adduction.

Abduction

Movement of an extremity on a transverse plane away from the axis or midline, where the axis lies on the frontal and sagittal planes.

abduction

Neurology Movement of an extremity on a transverse plane away from the axis or midline. Cf Adduction.

ab·duc·tion

(ab-dŭk'shŭn)
1. Movement of a body part away from the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the temple.
3. A position resulting from such movement.
Compare: adduction
[L. abductio]

abduction

A movement outwards from the mid-line of the body or from the central axis of a limb. The opposite, inward, movement is called ADDUCTION.
Figure 1: The sites of the main nerve centres and descending pathways in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary movement, represented in diagrammatic sections.

abduction

movement sideways of the arm at the shoulder, of the leg at the hip, of a finger, thumb or toe away from the middle of the hand or foot; abductor a muscle with this action; opposite of adduction. Figure 1.

abduct

; abduction movement away from the median line or sagittal plane

abduction (ab·dukˑ·shn),

n joint movement away from the body along the horizontal plane.
Enlarge picture
Abduction.

abduction 

Outward rotation of an eye, that is away from the midline. See duction; Duane's syndrome.

ab·duc·tion

(ab-dŭk'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with adduction.
1. Movement of a body part away from the median plane.
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the temple.
3. A position resulting from such movement.
[L. abductio]

abduction (abduk´shən),

n the process of abducting; opposite of adduction.

abduction

the act of abducting; the state of being abducted. For a digit, the drawing away from the axis of the limb.
References in classic literature ?
The great cloud-barred disk of the sun stood just above a limitless expanse of tossing white-caps--so to speak--a billowy chaos of massy mountain domes and peaks draped in imperishable snow, and flooded with an opaline glory of changing and dissolving splendors, while through rifts in a black cloud-bank above the sun, radiating lances of diamond dust shot to the zenith.
One after another the brave fellows, holding their colors high above their heads, leaped from the towering bows of their mighty craft to an awful death.
And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted -- nevermore!
And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadows on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted--nevermore!
I think that this should do," said he, glancing into the glass above the fireplace.
Upon the entire surface of that ancient planet I never before had seen a hill or mountain that exceeded four thousand feet in height above the dead sea bottoms, and as the ascent was usually gradual, nearly to their summits they presented but few opportunities for the practice of climbing.
The slopes of Otz and the distant Valley of Lost Souls held nothing to compel my interest then; but, towering far above me, the tower's carved wall riveted my keenest attention.
They swept along above cultivated fields of tobacco, maize, and barley, at full maturity, and here and there immense rice-fields, full of straight stalks and purple blossoms.
Upon a low-hanging branch sat Tarzan directly above the majestic, supple body as it forged silently through the thick jungle.
Above him was the throat of the balloon bunched and tied together, but with an open lumen through which,Bert could peer up into a vast, empty, quiet interior, and out of which descended two fine cords of unknown import, one white, one crimson, to pockets below the ring.
The river becomes very lovely from a little above Reading.
As the ruler of Ptarth, followed by his courtiers, descended from the landing-stage above the palace, the servants dropped into their places in the rear of their royal or noble masters, and behind the others one lingered to the last.