abdominal muscles


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Abdominal Muscles

The large muscles of the anterior abdominal wall—external oblique, internal oblique, rectus abdominalis—which help breathing, support spinal muscles whilst lifting, and help maintain abdominal organs and GI tract in their normal position.

abdominal muscles

Clinical anatomy The large muscles of the anterior abdominal wall–external oblique, internal oblique, rectus abdominalis, which help in breathing, support spinal muscles while lifting, and help maintain abdominal organs and GI tract in their normal position
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MUSCLES OF THE TRUNK

abdominal muscles

The abdominal muscles are made up of the cremaster, external abdominal oblique, iliacus, psoas major, pyramidalis, quadratus lumborum, rectus abdominis, and transversus abdominis muscles.
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See also: muscle
References in periodicals archive ?
Unilateral abdominal muscle herniation with pain: a distinctive variant of diabetic radiculopathy.
Other motions, such as raising the shoulders, activate additional abdominal muscles, creating an imbalance that further separates the recti muscles.
It has been hypothesized that trunk muscles, including the paraspinal and the lateral abdominal muscles, are associated with the initiation and progression of AIS.
Elliptical incision was given over the swelling followed by exposure of abdominal muscle. Hernial ring of approximately 6-7 cm on lower left lateral abdominal wall was observed.
Raise your upper body off the floor using your abdominal muscles, not your neck.
For abdominal muscles, four bilateral sets of implanted electrodes may have been insufficient because only every other rib interspace could be stimulated; thus, more electrode implants may be more effective.
The exact mechanism of abdominal muscle paresis following herpes zoster infection is poorly understood.
According to the National Institutes of Health, "exercise may be the most effective way to both speed recovery from low back pain and help strengthen back and abdominal muscles."
[2] The assessment of thickness of the abdominal muscles including transversus abdominis (TA), obliquus abdominis internus (OI) and oblique abdominis externus (OE) is known to be a valid measure of size of the abdominal muscles, as well as a sensitive measure of change.
The fossils also offer a puzzle: The fish had specialized abdominal muscles found today in land animals, but not in fish, paleontologists report June 13 in Science.
In addition, the pelvic and deep abdominal muscles are weak.