a-fib


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a-fib

(ā′fĭb′)
References in periodicals archive ?
A-Fib has been called "The New Epidemic in Cardiovascular Disease" because it is common in people over age 60, this "epidemic" will greatly affect the "baby boomer" generation.
A-fib is more common in men, tall people and the elderly.
Rather than a co-ordinated contraction of the heart muscles, people with A-Fib encounter a quivering of these muscles.
For most people, proper management of a-fib can significantly reduce the possibility of negative consequences, an MGH expert says.
NSAIDs used currently for 15 to 30 days were associated with higher a-fib risk relative to "never use.
At present, research on the causes of A-fib focuses on risk factors such as hypertension, alcohol use, viral infections, pulmonary issues, and others.
that accurately detected A-fib with 95 percent accuracy.
According to two studies, patients with atrial fibrillation treated with catheter ablation are less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia, and have a significantly reduced risk of stroke and death compared to A-fib patients with who are not treated with ablation.
Any one of these risk factors is associated with a 4% annual risk for stroke in a patient with either chronic or paroxysmal A-fib who is not anticoagulated.
In addition to discussing the latest in a-fib ablation research, this 2011 update covers all the key areas of therapy and patient management, including:
Unfortunately, studies have indicated that intermittent, episodic a-fib such as yours has about a five-percent chance per year of becoming permanent.