blocker

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Related to a-blocker: Ad blocker

blocker

 [blok´er]
something that blocks or obstructs a passage or activity; see also antagonist and blocking agent.
β-blocker (beta-blocker) beta-adrenergic blocking agent.
calcium channel blocker calcium channel blocking agent.
potassium channel blocker potassium channel blocking agent.
sodium channel blocker sodium channel blocking agent.

block·er

(blok'er),
An instrument used to obstruct a passage.

blocker

/block·er/ (blok´er) something that blocks or obstructs passage, activity, etc.
α-blocker  alpha-adrenergic blocking agent; see adrenergic blocking agent.
β-blocker  beta-adrenergic blocking agent; see adrenergic blocking agent.
calcium channel blocker  calcium channel blocking agent.
potassium channel blocker  potassium channel blocking agent.
sodium channel blocker  sodium channel blocking agent.

blocker

blocker

A popular term for anything which physically (e.g., a bed blocker, see there) or pharmacologically (e.g., a beta-blocker) impedes a process or activity.

block·er

(blok'ĕr)
1. An instrument used to obstruct a passage.

blocker

something that blocks or obstructs passage, activity, etc.

α-blocker, alpha-blocker
a drug that induces adrenergic blockade at α-adrenergic receptors.
β-blocker, beta-blocker
a drug that induces adrenergic blockade at either β1- or β2-adrenergic receptors, or both (see also beta-blocker).
calcium channel blocker
a drug that selectively inhibits the influx of calcium ions through a specific ion channel of cardiac muscle and smooth muscle cells (see also calcium channel blocker).
H2-receptor blocker
a drug, such as cimetidine that inhibits the secretion of gastric acid stimulated by histamine, pentagastrin, food and insulin, and also basal secretion; used in the treatment of peptic ulcer.
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, the most commonly used drugs are a-blockers and 5-a-reductase inhibitors; the former can decrease prostate smooth muscle tone and the latter can shrink the prostate.
Starting from 1994, the approach of combination therapy with a-blockers and antimuscarinics in men with bladder outlet obstruction and overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms has become increasingly accepted.
Other studies, including a meta-analysis done for the guidelines, suggest a-blockers are more effective than calcium channel blockers.
The study involves 625 North American clinical sites at which 42,448 high-risk hypertensive patients have been randomized to chlorthalidone, the calcium channel blocker amlodipine, the a-blocker doxazosin, or the ACE inhibitor lisinopril.
The rate of CHF in the diuretic group was 1% per year and twice that in the a-blocker group.
Patient compliance with the diuretic was superior to that for the a-blocker over the course of follow-up.