Binoculars

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Binoculars 

A set of two identical telescopes, one for each eye, which gives binocular vision of magnified distant objects. The images are erected using either an eyepiece of negative power, or prisms, or very occasionally, an additional lens system placed between objective and eyepiece. On binoculars, the magnification M and the diameter D of the objective or entrance pupil are shown as MD (e.g. 8 ✕ 30). Syn. field glasses; prism binoculars (for those which use prisms as erectors). See erector; galilean telescope; terrestrial telescope.
References in periodicals archive ?
IT'S EASY TO FIND A PAIR OF BINOCULARS THAT WILL FIT YOUR BUDGET BUT WILL THEY FIT YOUR NEEDS?
"The days of doing biology by sitting on a rock with a pair of binoculars are over," says Daniel Mulcahy, wildlife veterinarian with the Alaska Biological Science Center (ABSC).
To the surprise of many astronomers, the glow spied by the telescope was so bright that it could have been seen with a pair of binoculars.
You may already have a pair of binoculars, so expense is kept to a minimum.
Another ideal gift for the greatoutdoor lover is a pair of binoculars. What a joy to see far-away objects magnified in such a way.
A pair of binoculars dating from about 1860 came from the sailing ship White Star.
I once had occasion to ask a little neighbor boy if he knew how to use a pair of binoculars. "Sure," he answered confidently, "you look through the little end to make things big and you look through the big end to make things little." Pretty good answer, eh?
The latest of those is a pair of binoculars that are simply stunning.