mite

(redirected from a mite)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

mite

 [mīt]
any arthropod of the order Acarina except the ticks; they are characterized by minute size, usually transparent or semitransparent body, and other features distinguishing them from the ticks. They may be free living or parasitic on animals or plants, and may produce various irritations of the skin.
chigger mite (harvest mite) chigger.
itch mite (mange mite) Sarcoptes scabiei.

mite

(mīt),
A minute arthropod of the order Acarina, a vast assemblage of parasitic and (primarily) free-living organisms. Most are still undescribed, and only a relatively small number are of medical or veterinary importance as vectors or intermediate hosts of pathogenic agents, by directly causing dermatitis or tissue damage, or by causing blood or tissue fluid loss. The six-legged larvae of trombiculid mites, the chigger mites (Trombicula), are parasitic of humans and many mammals and birds; they are important as vectors of scrub typhus (tsutsugamushi disease) and other rickettsial agents. Some other important mites are Acarus hordei (barley mite), Demodex folliculorum (follicular or mange mite), Dermanyssus gallinae (red hen mite), Ornithonyssus bacoti (tropical rat mite), Ornithonyssus bursa (tropical fowl mite), Ornithonyssus sylviarum (northern fowl mite), Pyemotes tritici (straw or grain itch mite), and Sarcoptes scabiei (itch mite).
[A.S.]

mite

(mīt)
n.
Any of numerous small or minute arachnids of the order Acarina, including species that damage crops or stored food and species that are parasitic on animals and often transmit disease.

mite

any member of the order Acarina, ARACHNIDS possessing clawed appendages in front of the mouth (chelicarae). They may be free-living (many thousands/m2 in soil) or parasitic.

Mite

An insect parasite belonging to the order Acarina. The organism that causes scabies is a mite.
Mentioned in: Scabies
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: The tail of a mite, shown in pink in this false-color scanning electron micrograph, sits behind a hair in a hair follicle.
"This is an interesting way of going about [climate research]," says Cal Welbourn, a mite curator at the Florida State Collection of Arthropods in Gainesville.
The area under the curve (A, number of mites [degrees] C d) was calculated as the integral of the fined function, and a mite index, MI = In A, was calculated.
Seniczak and Seniczak (2002), carried out a study to examine the impact of cadmium under laboratory conditions on Archegozetes longisetosus which is a mite species.