Patient discussion about shingles

!!! The questions and answers on this page are written by patients and are not reviewed by health professionals.

Q. what is shingles?

A1My wife just had this. It took about two weeks for it to clear up. The sores were painful for her. We tried all kinds of over the counter medicine becuase we thought it was an insect bite or a skin rash. She went to the doctor and found out what it was. He correctly predicted the two week recovery.
A2Shingles is a skin rash caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. The virus responsible for these conditions is called the Varicella zoster virus (VZV). After an individual has chickenpox, this virus lives in the nervous system and is never fully cleared from the body. Under certain circumstances, such as emotional stress, immune deficiency (from AIDS or chemotherapy), or with cancer, the virus reactivates causing shingles. In most cases, however, a cause for the reactivation of the virus is never found. Anyone who has ever had chickenpox is at risk for the development of shingles, although it occurs most commonly in people over the age of 60. The herpes virus that causes shingles and chickenpox is not the same as the herpes virus that causes genital herpes (which can be sexually transmitted) and herpes mouth sores. Shingles is medically termed Herpes zoster.
http://www.medicinenet.com/shingles/article.htm
Hope this helps.
A3it's a skin disease that is caused by no other then the chicken pox virus. this one usually stays dormant in our body after first infection and never comes up. but if you are unlucky or have an immunic deficiency it might come up but this time with painful lesions.
here is a site with information and pictures:
http://dermnetnz.org/viral/herpes-zoster.html

Q. Is chicken pox dangerous to my fetus?

I am pregnant and have never had chicken pox before. My daughter is 2 years old and has not had chicken pox before and hasn't been vaccinated against it either. If she does catch chicken pox can this be dangerous to me or the fetus?
A1perhaps it will be then useful if the chicken pox would appear that you have then a separate room if necessary (quarantine).
i advice you also to inform yourself and build your own opinion with this link-page:

before you would like to go on with any vaccination, you should check out this very long list of links:

http://www.aegis.ch/neu/links.html

at the bottom you will also find links in english. vaccinations in general are very disputable/dubious and it is probably time that we learn about it.
A2Chickenpox (varicella zoster virus (VZV)) infection in pregnant women can lead to viral transmission through the placenta and therefore infect the fetus. If the infection occurs during the first 28 weeks of gestation, this can lead to fetal varicella syndrome (also known as congenital varicella syndrome). Effects on the fetus can range in severity from underdeveloped toes and fingers to severe anal and bladder malformation and brain damage. Infection late in gestation or immediately after birth is referred to as neonatal varicella. The risk of the baby developing the disease is greatest following exposure to infection in the period 7 days prior to delivery and up to 7 days after it.
A3If a pregnant woman who hasn't had chickenpox in the past contracts it (especially in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy), the fetus is at risk for birth defects and she is at risk for more health complications than if she'd been infected when she wasn't pregnant. If she develops chickenpox just before or after the child is born, the newborn is at risk for serious health complications. Therefore, it is advised that you vaccinate your daughter against chicken pox so she will not catch it and then could not pass it on to you.
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.