Patient discussion about melatonin

!!! The questions and answers on this page are written by patients and are not reviewed by health professionals.

Q. is there a blood test for melatonin

ATechnically there is but it is not a simple blood test and will not be done on a regular basis, and is probably very expenisve also.

Q. Any other treatment for sleeplessness problem than Melatonin???

33 years male having acute sleeping problem awake until 08:00-09:00am. Taking Melatonin failed.
A1Belladonna. [Bell]
The sleepless conditions calling for Belladonna are due to congestion; sleep is extremely restless, as a rule it is interrupted by talking, startings, muscular jerkings and spasmodic motions; frightful images appear on closing the eyes and the patient therefore dreads sleep. Children awake from sleep frightened. The dreams found under Belladonna are frightful ones, and they constantly awaken the patient. It is probably our best remedy for insomnia due to cerebral hyperaemia; that is, it will be most often indicated, also after morphine which produces cerebral hyperaemia of a passive variety. Aconite comes in here, too, but with Aconite there is intense anxiety and restlessness, fear of disaster or death. Cuprum, Stramonium and Zincum have the symptom that the patient is aroused from sleep frightened. For the complete list: http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/insomnia-sleeplessness-treatment-cure.asp Hope this helps.
A2The over-the-counter drugs (such as antihistamines or the herbal drug valerian) are not considered really effective in improving sleep (although the may increase sleepiness).

Remember to consult a doctor before taking any drug.

It's a really important subject, and you can read more about it here: http://www.sleepeducation.com/Disorder.aspx?id=6
A3First of all it's important to identify the cause of the sleeping problem. An abrupt onset may suggest the presence of stress, change in the sleeping environment or even some medical condition affecting sleep.

Treatment starts with treating the cause of the sleeping problem, if it’s known.

You may start by improving your sleep hygiene - keep a regular sleeping schedule and don't force yourself to sleep, avoid large meals, caffeine, smoking and alcohol before bedtime. Exercising regularly 20 minutes every day may also help, and so would dealing with the worries you have on your mind before you try to fall asleep.

If these don't help, then there are several medications that can help. The commonly used ones are benzodiazepines, prescribed by a doctor. However, they are usually not prescribed for more than 2 weeks because
They lose effectiveness and there may be withdrawal problems upon discontinuation.
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