Patient discussion about inspire

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Q. How can I know the inhaler is empty?

My 8 years-old boy has asthma and he takes steroids with inhaler. Every time it runs out of med we get a prescription for a new one. Is that OK? A friend that her son is treated with similar inhaler told me that towards the end it no longer delivers enough medication. How can I know I should get a new one?
A1Here is a video you may find usefull:
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A2Every inhaler has it's own capacity, usually expressed in "puffs". You should consult your pharmacist about how many puffs you can use the inhaler before you should get a new one.

Q. What are the side effects for the regular asthma inhalers?

I am taking an inhaler (non-steroid one) for my asthma and I wanted to know what can be possible side effects to this treatment.
A1Simple inhalers that contain a material that helps with keeping the bronchi not constricted, have side effects that are related to the sympathetic nervous system- such as slight tremor, small increase in heart rate or blood pressure, but these are all in greater risk when taking in a not-inhaled way. Patients must be cautioned against using these medicines too frequently, as with such use their efficacy may decline, producing desensitization resulting in an exacerbation of symptoms which may lead to refractory asthma, meaning that the attack might not be relieved by these medications anymore.

A2The typical non steroid inhaler for asthmatic use, contains fast-acting bronchodilators (drugs that help keep the airways open). These are called short-acting, selective beta2-adrenoceptor agonists. Tremors, the major side effect, have been greatly reduced by inhaled delivery, which allows the drug to target the lungs specifically. Oral and injected medications are delivered throughout the body. There may also be cardiac side effects at higher doses (due to Beta-1 agonist activity), such as elevated heart rate or blood pressure.

Q. Is a Proventil Inhaler cheaper by you than Secirity Blue?

I pay $60. with Security Blue now. Is it cheaper with you for a three months supply ?
A1here is a drug prices comparing site-
http://www.compare-prescription-prices.com/drug/Proventil.htm

but i couldn't find there that other drug you were talking about....is that it's name?
A2I would think that if you did buy more then it would be cheaper, maybe not by much but at least a few bucks. Hope this helps.

Q. Does steroids make children shorter?

My 10 years-old son has asthma, and is treated with a steroid inhaler. Will this treatment cause him to be shorter in the future?
A1I don't think so. My cousin had asthma very badly when he was young, and he grew up to be tall, strong and healthy, thank goodness. Sometimes one does outgrow this, sometimes now, but as far as growth goes, I don't think it will stump growth.
A2steroids do have an effect on bones,not growth--if someone with chronic asthma were to be given steroids by mouth for long periods of time years ,your boned lose calcium,osteoarthritis will accure.there used to by people who had to take steroids over long periods of time to control there asthma---and evewn today steroids are still used because it is the only thing that will break an asthma attack.there are side effects to any drug you use--even alternative meds have side effects if not used the right way.
A3Lower doses of inhaled steroids were generally found to have a smaller effect on growth.
However, it seems that there is compensation for the growth delay, for example by growing for longer periods, so that the long term effect is apparently minimal.
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